CSA Newsletter

Welcome to Millsap Farms Winter CSA Harvest List and Newsletter!
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FMO pickups this Saturday! (March 12)

Next winter CSA is March 22.
“Spring” and Caterpillar Tunnels

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Our new caterpillar tunnel - ready for Tomatoes

March 8, 2016 Welcome to spring!  Well, not formally, until the spring solstice on the 20th, but it certainly feels like it with 70 degree days and 50 degree nights…  So we are planting like crazy, trying to get as much in the ground as we can, in the hopes that this warm trend means earlier veggies, from tomatoes to asparagus.  At the same time we are hedging our bets, providing a protective environment for the seedlings going into the field.  Our memories are not as long as some, but they are long enough to know that warm weather in February and March doesn’t mean that we are done with wintery weather entirely, or that we won’t have torrential rains and hail. 

Part of our job as your farmers is to give our crops every advantage they can have, within an organic framework, thereby ensuring the best possible variety and supply of vegetables.  One of the ways we do this is by building covered growing space.  On Millsap Farm, this takes three forms; structural greenhouses, high tunnels, and caterpillar tunnels.  This week we have been working on a new caterpillar tunnel: this is a 150’ long, 20’ wide set of pipe hoops, covered with re-used plastic (plastic we took off of other greenhouses because it was no longer serviceable on those structures).  This structure has several benefits for the farm; first is the low cost of the tunnel, as it’s built out of 90% re-used materials from our resource piles, and so has cost us only about $200 so far.   Secondly, it will protect tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant from hail, wind, and rain, all of which cause damage to the plants and fruit, so we will have higher yields of higher quality fruit.  For example, last year, when it rained more in the three months of summer than we usually get in 7 months of the year, the tomatoes and peppers under cover were the only ones that produced tomatoes for more than a couple of weeks;  the other 1,000 plants in the field wilted under the disease pressure caused by the constant leaf wetness.  Finally, it gives us a space to work when the weather outside is not favorable for working.  So when this big several day rain storm finally arrives,  we will have a dry space to put our early tomatoes into, so they can grow without being beaten up by the weather.  

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Being erected

It’s always an adventure out here, and I’m sure these caterpillar tunnels will supply a few new wild stories, but so far so good, and we are excited about the possibilities. 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers,

Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, Chris, Kira, Baron, David, and all the other crew at Millsap Farm. 
 

What’s in your share?

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Chinese, Napa Cabbage

Full Shares:
Chinese/Napa Cabbage
Spinach
Kale
Head Lettuce
Cilantro
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Amish)
Spaghetti Squash (conventionally grown by Amish)
Japanese Turnips
Sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichokes)
Salad Mix or Turnip Greens
Green Onions
Turmeric
Parsnips, Beets or Carrots
Turnips or Black Spanish Radish (these are spicy)
Edible Flowers (Pansies) or Chickweed

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Half Share:
Spinach
Head Lettuce
Cilantro
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown  by Amish)
Spaghetti Squash (conventionally grown by Amish)
Japanese Turnips
Kale
Sunchokes (Jerusalem Artichokes)
Salad Mix or Turnip Greens
Turnips or Black Spanish Radish (spicy)

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Sampler Shares:
Spinach
Head Lettuce
Cilantro
Spaghetti Squash (conventionally grown by Amish)
Japanese Turnips
Salad Mix or Turnip Greens

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Notes about unusual things in your share today:
Pansies – edible flowers – tasty and color additions to salad 
Chickweed – edible weed – tasty addition to salad
Sunchokes – may cause a little gas – eat a little at a time if you have never tried them before – can be eaten raw or cooked
Black Spanish Radish

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 – these are spicy – eat with oil or cheese to help tame the heat (grate for salads, etc) also known for its health benefits
Turmeric – this is cured, so you can leave it our your counter or put n fridge – but take it out of the plastic bag for storage.  grate just like fresh ginger.  Tasty in tea, curries and stir fries.Roasted Sunchokes

1 pound Jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes)
1 tablespoon minced garlic
3/4 cup olive oil
2 Tablespoons dried thyme
sea slat to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees
Scrub artichokes tubers and trim.  Cut tuber into 1 inch pieces.
Mix olive oil, thyme, garlic and sea salt together in a large bowl; add sunchoke pieces and toss to coat.  Arrange coated prices in one evenly-spaced layer on a baking sheet.
Roast in the preheated oven until sun chokes are tender, 35 to 45 minutes.

Chicken Enchilada Stuffed Spaghetti Squash
Serves: 4

1 spaghetti squash (about 4 lbs.)
2 5-oz. boneless skinless chicken breast cutlets, pounded to 1/2-inch thickness
1 tsp. cumin
½ tsp. garlic powder
¼ tsp. chili powder
½ tsp. salt
⅓ cup chopped onion
⅓ cup chopped bell pepper
¼ cup black beans
½ cup red enchilada sauce
½ cup shredded reduced-fat Mexican-blend cheese

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Microwave squash for 6 minutes, until soft enough to cut.  Halve lengthwise; scoop out and discard seeds.  Fill a large baking pan with 1/2 inch water.  Add squash halves, cut sides down.  Bake until tender, about 40 minutes.  

Transfer chicken to a large bowl.  Shred with two forks, or finely chop.  Remove skillet from heat; re-spray and bring to medium heat on stove.  Add onion, bell pepper, remaining 1/2 tsp cumin, 1/4 tsp garlic powder. 1/8 tsp chili powder and 1/4 tsp salt.  Add 3 tbsp water.  Cook and stir until veggies have mostly softened and browned and water has evaporated, about 3 minutes.

Transfer veggies to the large bowl.  Add black beans, 1/4 cup enchilada sauce. and 1/4 cup cheese.  Mix until uniform.  Remove baking pan from the oven, but leave oven on.  Remove squash halves, thoroughly blot dry.

Empty water from baking pan.  Return squash halves, cut side up.  Pour some enchilada sauce in each half, pile with filling and top with cheese.  Bake until cheese has melted.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

Copyright © 2016 Millsap Farms, All rights reserved. 

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Pickup at the farm

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