Winter CSA week 3

Farm News: Thanksgiving on the FarmNovember 22, 2016

Since I’ve started farming over a decade ago, I’ve learned a lot about gratitude. 

Perhaps it’s partly because of our constant exposure to the outdoors, where we realize just how vulnerable we are to the weather, which is completely out of our control. Having seen 80 mile per hour winds, hail the size of baseballs, and unprecedented rainstorms, I’m grateful for each day that brings sunshine or rain, heat or snow. Every morning is a cause for celebration, as a new day brings endless variety in the weather.

Perhaps it’s realizing how amazingly we are knit together, from the way our bodies continue to bend and lift to weed and harvest, or the satisfaction of learning a new skill, repeating it until it is etched in muscle memory, reducing waste motion until our bodies perform a dance with the task at hand. 

Perhaps it’s appreciating that we live in a world of grace, with many opportunities for second, third, and beyond chances. Every time we come to the end of a season I’m struck by what a blessing it is that we’ll get to try it again next season, tweaking our plan and execution just a bit. For each day that doesn’t go the way we wish it had, there is another to follow, with an opportunity to redeem what is lost.

Perhaps it’s the joy of working with my family, and close friends, helping each other accomplish the work set before us, sharing meals, playing together, meeting new friends together. 

 Perhaps it’s the comfort of seeing CSA members who embody what it means to be Community Supported Agriculture, as we see them weekly and talk to them about their lives and how much they value what we do here. Our work is made so much more valuable by the appreciation of our members.

Altogether, I would say that it seems like I am right where I belong, and I’m truly grateful for that. Thank you for your role in that, and I pray that your Thanksgiving is truly blessed.

Farmer Curtis

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Spinach

Kale

Mizuna

Chinese Cabbage (Napa Cabbage)

Bok Choi

Sweet Potatoes (Matthew’s Family Farm, AR)

Green Bell Peppers

Fennel

Parsley or Rosemary

Winter Squash (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Carrots

Onions

Garlic

Cauliflower (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield)

Celery


Bread:

French Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Spinach

Green Bell Peppers

Mizuna

Chinese Cabbage (Napa Cabbage)

Celery

Parsley or Rosemary

Sweet Potatoes (Matthew’s Family Farm, AR)

Winter Squash (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Carrots

Onions

Garlic


Sampler Share:

Green Bell Peppers

Spinach

Celery

Sweet Potatoes (Matthew’s Family Farm, AR)

Winter Squash (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Carrots


What do I do with….
Mizuna:

Salad. Wash and chop the salad into bite size pieces. Mix with lettuce or any greens for salad. 

Pasta. Even Asian greens can be tossed with pasta and fresh parmesan. Boil noodles of your choice al dente. While the noodles are cooking sauté chopped mizuna in olive oil with garlic. When the noodles are ready, drain and reserve 1 cup of the pasta water. Toss the noodles, parm, and a bit of the pasta water together in a skillet over low heat. Add more pasta water if the mixture looks dry. Serve with crushed red pepper and extra cheese!

Risotto. Another Italian inspired use for mizuna! Stir chopped and cleaned mizuna into a batch of risotto at the end of cooking. It will wilt perfectly. Try pairing with mushrooms for an earthy dish.

Stir-fry. Asian greens are of course perfect for stir-fry! Pair with any vegetables in your share, lots of garlic and ginger, and your protein of choice. 

Soup. We love greens in miso soup, but feel free to toss them into any vegetable soup at the end of cooking. Mizuna would also pair well with chicken noodle or light creamy soups.

Grain Salads. Toss raw mizuna with farro, quinoa, rice, barley, or any grain for fresh salad perfect for picnics and potlucks.

Sauté. The simplest is last! Wash mizuna and then toss in a pan with garlic and olive oil. 

Asian Cabbage Slaw Recipe

6 cups shredded Chinese cabbage(about 1 medium-size head)

¼ cup finely minced scallions

1 tablespoon finely slivered fresh ginger

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

⅓ cup rice vinegar

1 tablespoon light soy sauce

⅓ cup Oriental sesame oil

1 tablespoon finely minced fresh coriander leaves

 Hot red pepper flakes to taste

Put the cabbage in a large bowl. Toss with the scallions and ginger.

Put the sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium-high heat and toast until golden, about three minutes. Remove from heat; set aside.

Mix the vinegar, soy sauce and sesame oil together. Pour the dressing over the cabbage and toss gently. Add the coriander leaves and red pepper flakes and toss again.

Transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle with the toasted sesame seeds. The salad is ready to serve, but it can wait, at room temperature, an hour or two before serving.

 
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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