This is CSA week 12

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

The crew this morning picking green beans!
MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E
This is CSA week 12!  

Reminder: If you are not able to pick up your share on Tuesday/Saturday, and would like us to hold it in the farm cooler, please let us know and we will gladly do that for you to pick up later.  If you do not let us know, we will not pack up a share for you.  Thanks!
Farm News: Planting for the future, Harvesting for the Present 
July 25, 2017
CSA and market farming is all about looking ahead while also paying enough attention to the present to do it justice.  This week we are balancing our time between harvesting hundreds of pounds of summer favorites, like bell peppers, green beans, sweet corn, tomatoes, eggplant and basil, and preparing beds for fall, including planting kohlrabi, broccoli, kale, lettuce, carrots, beets, and cauliflower.   This means that our attention has to be somewhat divided; being sure that our current crops are being watered, harvested, and generally cared for, while at the same time putting a lot of effort into tilling, laying biodegradeable mulch, transplanting, etc.  After ten years of farming, it’s easier than it used to be to maintain this tension between working in the present and preparing for the future, but it’s still a challenge.  In fact, it’s one of the things that keeps our vocation interesting; the constant challenge of timing, prioritizing, creating and executing the plan.   So while we are swimming in tomatoes, and hot peppers are just beginning to be harvested, and we love all the fresh salsa and pizza sauce that those bring with them, we are also working hard to be sure that come September and October and November, we’ll all be enjoying an abundance of fresh carrots, broccoli, lettuce, and cabbage, the fruit of planning and execution from months before.  

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers.
Curtis, Sarah, and the Crew at Millsap Farm
 
What's in your share?
Full Share:
Tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce
Sweet Corn (caterpillars included)
Summer Squash
Cucumbers
Choice of eggplant, okra or oyster mushrooms*

Bread Share:
Marketplace Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
White peaches and Yellow peaches – Bader Farm
Half Share:
Tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce

Sampler Share:
Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce

*Oyster mushrooms eaten raw can cause some people to vomit. Oyster mushrooms store best in a paper bag in your fridge. Plastic makes them slimy.

Grilled Okra
(Serves 6)
• 1 pound okra, washed
• 2 teaspoons olive oil
• salt, to taste
• ground black pepper, to taste
• pinch of cayenne pepper, optional
1 Skewer okra or place in a grill basket to prevent it from going through the grill grates while cooking. Drizzle with olive oil and place onto grill that has been preheated to around 450º F.
2 Cook until the skin of the okra begins to caramelize and then flip to cook the other side.
3 Remove from the grill and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Add cayenne pepper, if desired.
4 Serve warm.
One Pot Stuffed Pepper Casserole
(Serves 6)
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1 pound ground beef*
• 1 onion, diced
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• 1 green bell pepper, diced
• 1 red bell pepper, diced
• 2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
• 1 (4-ounce) can diced green chiles
• 1 cup rice
• 1 cup beef broth*
• 1 teaspoon chili powder
• 1/2 teaspoon cumin
• Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves
• 1 cup shredded Wisconsin cheddar cheese
• 1/2 cup shredded Wisconsin Monterey Jack cheese
1 Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add ground beef, onion and garlic. Cook until beef has browned, about 3-5 minutes, making sure to crumble the beef as it cooks; drain excess fat.
2 Stir in bell peppers until tender, about 3-4 minutes
3 Stir in tomatoes, green chiles, rice, beef broth, chili powder and cumin; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Bring to a boil; cover, reduce heat and simmer until rice is cooked through, about 16-18 minutes. Stir in cilantro.
4 Remove from heat and top with cheeses. Cover until cheese has melted, about 2 minutes.
5 Serve immediately.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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Tomatoes Tomatoes Tomatoes!  It’s CSA Week 11

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Over 700 pounds of tomatoes this week – start thinking’ about all those yummy tomato recipes!!

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E

Farm News: Heat on the Farm

July 18, 2017

This time of year we get asked a lot about how heat effects the farm, so I thought I’d share some insights about high temperature vegetable growing.   Like many aspects of our farm, we look at this through three lenses; people, profits, and planet.   For the people on the farm, the heat means challenging work conditions;  95 degrees with 70% humidity makes for miserably sweaty weather, so we rise early, starting work at 6 a.m., and get a head start on the heat.  That means that by 1p.m. we are hot, sweaty, and ready for lunch, which is the end of our official work day.  If  we have things what must get done, we will wait until after the heat passes, 6 or 7 p.m., and go back out to work, or work wet (meaning hosing off or taking a dunk every hour or so).   We call this the siesta schedule, and it helps us face the dog days of summer with energy and stamina.  It also helps that most days we take a trip to the creek to dip and cool off, and we occasionally take off a whole day to float a creek and thoroughly relax and refresh the crew.

In terms of profits, hotter days mean a change in what we can grow for sale;  the lettuces and most other salad greens are just too stressed by this heat and bolt (go to seed) before they are large enough to harvest (although we are trying some new things this summer, stay tuned), while some crops like tomatoes and bell peppers and cucumbers shrug off the heat and ramp up production.  If it gets too hot, even the tomatoes can revolt; night time temperatures consistently above 75 will cause tomatoes to drop their blossoms, which means no new fruit being set. This is the sort of problem that has a delayed cost;  4-6 weeks after an extreme hot spell we find that the tomatoes have a gap in fruit supply.  We can deal with this to some extent by sheltering tomatoes from the worst of the suns rays,  planting later successions of heat tolerant varieties (florida 91’s are one such variety), and keeping them well watered,  but ultimately we can only do so much, and high heat decreases yields, leaving fewer veggies for our members and our market stand.  Finally, from the environmental, or planet perspective, we have increased energy use when the temps are high, due to increased water usage and a heavier load on our walk-in cooler.  Our efforts to reduce water and electricity pay their biggest dividends this time of year, and we hope to continue to reduce our footprint this way as we refine and remodel our farm stand space, along with improving our soils, which reduces our need for watering.

All in all, heat is one of the bigger challenges or our climate; it stresses people, the budget, and our commitment to reducing our environmental impact, but over time we’ve developed systems which help us cope and even thrive.  Plus, what would summer be without a few hot days to spend in the creek eating watermelon?

Thanks for trusting us to be your farmers.
Curtis and the crew.

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Eggplant
Basil or Rosemary
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Pepper
Squash, Cucumber or Okra
Onions
Jalapeños
Beets

Bread Share:
French Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
Peaches from Bader Farm

Half Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers, Squash or Okra
Basil or Rosemary
Onions

Sampler Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers, Squash or Okra

*This is our sweet corn – it DOES have some caterpillars in the ear. 

Sicilian Tomato and Onion Salad Recipe
Serves 4

  • 3 -4 large ripe tomatoes
  • 1⁄2-1 medium  sweet onion, depending on how much onion you like (Vidallia is my favorite)
  • 1⁄4cup  extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon  dried oregano
  • 1⁄4teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1⁄8teaspoon fresh cracked black pepper
  • 4 -6 leaves  fresh basil, chopped to garnish (depending on how much Basil you like)
  1. Cut tomatoes into bite size pieces.
  2. Sprinkle with garlic salt and pepper.
  3. Peel a cut onion in half vertically.
  4. Along edge of open side, “sliver” cut onion and add to tomatoes.
  5. Add the rest of ingredients and toss lightly.
  6. Marinate for at least an hour.
  7. Serve with Italian bread, provolone cheese and hard salami (or other Italian meats.).
Fresh Sweet Corn Salad with Tomatoes and Feta
Serves 6

  • 5 ears of corn, husk and silk removed
  • 1 pint sweet cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 green onions, sliced (1/3 cup)
  • ⅓ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ⅓ cup crumbled feta
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 medium garlic clove, pressed
  • salt and black pepper
  1. In a large pot, bring water to a boil. Add corn and boil for 3 minutes. Remove corn to a plate and cool just enough to handle. When the corn is cool, cut the kernels off the cob, cutting close to the cob, and place them in a large bowl. You should have approximately 4 cups of corn.
  2. Add the tomatoes, green onions, cilantro, and feta to the corn.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the olive oil, vinegar, and garlic. Pour over the salad and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Cover and chill for 15-30 minutes before serving.
Okra with Tomatoes

Saute 4 smashed garlic cloves in 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat until golden. Add 4 cups okra (halved lengthwise) and 1 small onion (cut into wedges); season with salt and pepper and cook until the okra is tender and bright, 10 to 12 minutes. Add 1 pint halved cherry tomatoes; cook until just bursting, 3 minutes. Finish with a splash of cider vinegar.

Tomato and Eggplant Tian
4 servings

  • 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small eggplant, sliced 1/4-inch thick
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 small onions, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rounds
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 small tomatoes, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rounds
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan

Position the oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a large saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Add the eggplant slices, season with salt and cook until golden on both sides. Remove to a plate and repeat with the onion slices.

Rub a small baking dish with the garlic clove. Layer the eggplant, onions, and tomato slices in rows in the baking dish. Drizzle a little more olive oil on top. Cover the baking dish with aluminum foil and bake until heated through and the tomatoes are soft but still hold their shape, about 20 minutes. Remove the baking dish and set the oven to broil. Sprinkle the tomatoes with the shredded cheese and broil to melt and brown the cheese, about another 2 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve.

Recipe courtesy of Melissa d’Arabian

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew
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Farm News: The Three P’s of Sustainable Farming, Part 3- ProfitJuly 11, 2017

This week we continue with our essay about what it means for Millsap Farm to be sustainable.
 

Harlequin bugs are frustrating little bugs that LOVE our kale, cabbages, bok choi, arugula and collards. They suck the plant sap out of the leafs and leave yellow and brown damage. We are instituting a “Brassica” (plant family that Harlequin bugs like to eat) free month of July. All our kale is mowed – so no more kale until the fall planted greens are ready to harvest.

People often tour our farm to see a sustainable farm in action, either as educational groups, or as part of pizza night. When they arrive on farm, I give a brief introduction; first generation farm family, 20 acres, on farm for 10 years, 2 acres in vegetable production, selling through CSA, Farmers Market of The Ozarks, and a few restaurants, three or four full time farm workers, etc. Then I explain that we try to make all of our decisions through the lens of the three P’s; Planet, People, and Profit.  

 

Profit is the third leg of our sustainability stool, and it is every bit as important as the others. If we don’t farm in a profitable manner, we will not be in business for very long. So as we make choices about how to grow and sell produce, we look carefully at how it will impact our profitability. One example of this is the amount we do or don’t heat our greenhouse; many greenhouses use large propane forced air heaters to keep their greenhouses warm through the winter, but we have chosen to avoid the expense of fueling these heaters, because in our analysis, we are better off using less heat, and providing it with wood burning furnaces. This also means we grow things with require less heat, and that means less risk; if our greenhouse gets a little cold in January, that’s not a problem for our head lettuces, carrots, and spinach, whereas if we were growing tomatoes or other heat loving crops using higher temperatures, we would lose our entire investment if we had a freeze at the wrong time. Instead we wait until a little later in the year to grow the heat lovers, when we can rely on the sun to do 90% of our heating, and supplement with wood and propane to keep thing s going on the occasional very cold night in March and April. This way we still get to keep our members and farmers market customers happy with early produce, but don’t have a risky investment. 

 

Another example of examining our farm structure with profit in mind is the CSA model. We love that one way we are linked to our members is that we all have a financial stake in the outcome each season. Our members invest in us, considering it a good investment that will yield healthy food for their families, a cleaner environment, and a satisfying connection to the source of their food. At the same time, their investment helps our bottom line by giving us operating capital during the early part of the year, when many farms take out risky loans to pay for seeds, fuel, tools, fertilizer, labor, and all the other things it takes to grow food in the earth. Instead of costly credit, we use the money you all have entrusted to us to get our season started debt free. In a business as inherently risky as farming, it’s nice to start each year on a solid financial footing provided by our members, which is one more reason we love CSA.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the brief snapshot that these three P’s have given you of our decision making framework on the farm, please feel free to ask questions and communicate with us. We love to hear from our members.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers. 

Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, Erick, Caitlyn, Elsa, Colby, Ella, David, Emma, Leticia, Anna, Isabella, Leta, Sophia, Grace, Ruth, Reuben, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm.

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicer Tomatoes

Eggplant

Bell Pepper

Yellow Onions

Romaine Lettuce

Carrots

Kohlrabi or squash choice

Basil

Celery

Cucumber
Bread Share:

Oatmeal Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap
Fruit Share:

Peaches – Bader Farms

Half Share:

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicer TOmatoes

Eggplant

Bell Pepper

Yellow Onions

Red mini head lettuce

Kohlrabi or squash choice

Basil

Cucumber
Sampler Share:
Cherry Tomatoes

Eggplant

Yellow Onions

Carrots

Cucumber
 

Alternative ways to use your CSA veggies….
Freezing: 

Most things need to be blanched first and then frozen. Good candidates are tomatoes, Kale, Squash, Peppers (these can just be cut and frozen on a cookie sheet then put in a ziplock in the freezer), okra, basil pesto, etc.
Fermenting:

Generally – chop up your veggies, add preferred herbs, put in a mason jar or other glass jar – fill with salty water and let ferment on your counter for a couple days to a week. Then keep them in the fridge. Look up recipes to get an exact salt amount. Great things to ferment are: Cucumbers, Beets, Carrots, Onions, Peppers, Kohlrabi, Squash, Corn, Garlic, etc.
Pickling:

Add some vinegar and keep in your fridge (or can them if you like). Usually salt and or sugar and spices are involved!

Great things to Pickle: Cucumbers, Squash, Onions, Okra, Peppers etc.
 

Roasted Eggplant Dip with Greek Yogurt

3 medium eggplants (about 2 pounds) 

1 small garlic clove, minced 

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper 

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 

1/2 cup plain full-fat Greek yogurt 

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (from 2 lemons)
Using tongs, cook eggplants one at a time over the flame of a gas burner (or a grill), turning as skin chars and bubbles, until completely soft, about 15 minutes. (If eggplant doesn’t soften, finish cooking on a baking sheet in a 375-degree oven.) Let stand until cool enough to handle, about 15 minutes. Peel off charred skin and discard. Coarsely chop the eggplants, and place in a colander to drain, about 1 hour. Finely chop, and transfer to a bowl. 

Using a chef’s knife, press flat side of blade back and forth across garlic and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt to make a paste. Mix into eggplant. Stir in oil. Mix in yogurt and lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper. (Dip can be refrigerated, for up to 1 day.) Drizzle with oil before serving.
 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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The Three P’s of Sustainable farming, Part 2, People MatterJuly 5, 2017

This week we return to the topic of sustainable farming, after a brief interruption last week to note the wind damage to the high tunnels. 
 

People often tour our farm to see a sustainable farm in action, either as educational groups, or as part of pizza night. When they arrive on farm, I give a brief introduction; first generation farm family, 20 acres, on farm for 10 years, 2 acres in vegetable production, selling through CSA, Farmers Market of The Ozarks, and a few restaurants, three or four full time farm workers, etc. Then I explain that we try to make all of our decisions through the lens of the three P’s; Planet, People, and Profit.  

 

People are a key part of the farm community, from family members and farmworkers to CSA members, to the wider community that attends pizza night and buys from us at the farmers market. We want to treat the people involved with our farm in an ethical and principled way, and in a way that honors their desire to be happy and have a balanced life. For example, one of the reasons we have lots of covered growing space on the farm is because it gives us a place to work in inclement weather; because we can keep busy even in poor weather, we are able to even out our workload, rather than cramming all our work into a few perfect days. Another benefit of growing under covered space is that we are able to supply good fresh food for our members year-round, which makes them happy. Our decision to grow naturally is also a choice we made largely due to people; we feel good about feeding our family and members food that doesn’t contain pesticide residue. Our open door policy is also a result of this principle; it’s increasingly difficult for folks to connect with the source of their food, and even rarer for families to participate in a hands-on way. We love having our members come work with us on the farm, and we have structured our farm in such a way that this is possible. There are many more examples of the way people are considered on our farm, from our vacation policy to our options for delivery and pickup of your shares; we try to keep this a central guiding principle as we continue to process of creating and remaking the farm.

 

Reminder; summer CSA balances are due as of this month; if you still have a balance, you’ll be receiving an e-mail with payment information on it, you are welcome to bring payment to CSA pickup, mail it, or pay online.

 

Next week, a look at a couple of ways that the third P of sustainable farming ties into the design of our farm. 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers. 
Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, David, Erick, Elsa, Caitlyn, Ella, Colby, Emma, Leticia, Anna, Isabella, Leta, Sophia, Grace, Ruth, Reuben, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm.

 

 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Kale

Salad greens

Head Lettuce

Basil

Garlic
Bread Share:

Honey Whole wheat Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap


Fruit Share:

Peaches by Bader Farms

Half Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Kale

Salad Greens
Sampler Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Salad Greens

 

Pesto:
4-6 cups Basil – take the large stems out

1 cup Olive oil

4 to 6 garlic cloves

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

1/4 cup nuts (pine nuts are traditional, walnuts work just fine)

salt and pepper to taste
Mix it all in a blender. Add more olive oil if your blender needs more liquid. Will keep for two weeks in your fridge. You can also freeze in an ice cube tray and keep it for a while in the freezer!

Millet Pesto Summer Salad

– from the full helping
Ingredients

1 cup millet, dry

2¼ cups low sodium vegetable broth or water

3 cups zucchini, chopped into ¾” pieces

3 cups eggplant, chopped into ¾” pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil

Sea salt and black pepper to taste

1 large beefsteak or heirloom tomato, chopped

½-2/3 cup pesto

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Lay the zucchini and eggplant pieces on one or two lined baking sheets and drizzle them with the oil, then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Transfer them to the oven and roast for 30-35 minutes, or until tender. Stir them once, halfway through cooking.

Place the millet and broth or water in a medium sized saucepan or pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until the millet absorbs all of the liquid. Fluff the millet with a fork, re-cover, and allow it to steam for 5 minutes.

Transfer the millet to a bowl. Add the roasted vegetables, the fresh tomato, and the pesto. You can adjust the amount of pesto you use to taste, and you can also season the salad to taste with black pepper and extra salt. A little squeeze of lemon at the end is nice, too! Serve.

4-6 servings

 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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Wood-fired Pizza Menu 6.15.17

We will have Alexa Kilgore here to entertain, dough will be flying and the fires hot and cooking, get your reservations for this Thursday night at https://millsapfarms.wordpress.com/pizza-a-place-to-party/
Dating the Blueberries
Homemade pizza sauce made with Date Lady Syrup, blueberries from Fassnight Creek Farm, Basil, Millsap raised Chicken, Mozzarella and Parmesan
Margherita Blanco
Homemade white and red sauce, homegrown Tomatoes,
Basil, and Fresh Mozzarella
           
Pretty P’s
Homemade Pesto, Pepperoni made by City Butcher with pork raised at Millsap’s, Spring Onions, Mushrooms and Mozzarella
Farmhouse Cheese
Marinara sauce all covered up with cheese
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Week 5 summer CSA

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER
Colleen cleaning up the spring onions.

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

 

CSA Week 5!! We are five weeks in – if you need to change pick up locations or your share size let us know!

Farm News: The Millsaps are headed to the river!

June 6, 2017

The Millsaps are headed to the river!

One of the things we love about our farm is that we don’t have to drive to work; we are living in the middle of our work. On the other hand, one of the risks of farming is that we will never set our work aside, and lose track of the other things in life that matter. I’ve become more and more aware that until we step away from the farm, and our home, we tend to get stuck in the rut of working constantly. One way we try to guard against that is taking vacations away from the farm as a family. Today we are headed to the river for the rest of the week, going to enjoy a beautiful camping trip on the Buffalo with our family. We love going to the river, it’s a great adventure, and also a perfect way to cut ties with the hustle and bustle of the farm and get away for a bit. We return to the farm rejuvenated, with our priorities reset, ready to dive into summer work and play on the farm. Our community makes this possible; of course, we absolutely couldn’t do this without Kimby and Cammie, David, John, Elsa, Caitlyn, Eric, Debbie, Erick, and many others who carry on the farm labor while we are gone, and of course our CSA members are a big part of the equation as well; without your support, financial and otherwise, we would not be able to take a vacation. So thank you for being a part of this community, and thank you for allowing my family to spend time together having an adventure.

Farmer Curtis

 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Head Lettuce

Salad mix

Kohlrabi

Beets

Carros

Tomato

Bok Choi

Basil

Cucumber

Squash

Herb choice (dill, cilantro, Mint, Rosemary)

Spring Onions
Bread Share:

Bread by B&B Boulangerie this week

Half Share:

Head Lettuce

Salad mix

Kohlrabi

Cherry Tomatoes

Basil

Cucumbers

Squash
Sampler Share:

Head Lettuce

Kohlrabi

Cherry tomatoes

Basil

Cucumber or Squash
Fruit Share:

Blueberries
 

Notes & What do I do with….
Kohlrabi

These come with or without greens – today you have a nice amount of leaves attached. Cut off the leaves and use them in a sautéed greens mix (kinda like collards).

The round green veggie now needs it’s outer skin cut off either use a veggie peeler twice or a sharpe knife.  

What’s left is a crunchy, sweet broccoli/apple vegetable. My (Kimby) favorite way of eating these is sliced raw, or grated into a Kohlrabi Slaw.

You can also roast Kohlrabi or add to soups or sauté in a stir fry.

Bok Choi

Full shares are getting a bok choi this week. This is a type of Asian Cabbage.

You can use this raw in a salad (with asian ginger dressing!)

The easiest way of using this veggie is stir fry. Either by itself with some garlic as a side or in a mix with other veggies – just a short time in a hot pan wilts these cabbages perfectly. Add a little soy sauce and you’ve got a great meal!

Blueberry Basil Salad Dressing

1/2 cup fresh blueberries

1/8 cup fresh basil, chopped

2 tbsp raw apple cider vinegar

2 tbsp olive oil

1/2 tsp honey

pinch of salt

Place all your ingredients in a bowl and blend until smooth. I like to use an immersion blender (that thing comes in handy often.) Serve on greens or keep in fridge for future use.
Good for 1-2 weeks if kept sealed and chilled.
Japanese Ginger Salad Dressing

1 cup olive oil

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 lemon, juiced

3 cloves garlic, minced

3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger root

1 teaspoon prepared Dijon-style mustard

2 teaspoons honey

ground black pepper to taste

In a small bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, lemon juice, garlic, ginger, mustard, honey and pepper. Once these are thoroughly combined, add the oil in a steady stream, whisking constantly. When all of the oil is incorporated into the dressing, pour into a glass jar and chill until serving.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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The menu for Thursday Night Pizza Club

Here what we are cooking for this week for Thursday Night Wood-Fired Pizza Club, do you have your reservations? Snag them at http://millsapfarm.csasignup.com/store/2900
eSscape the Coop

Homemade Garlic Aioli, mozzarella, garlic scapes, Millsap raised roasted chicken, radicchio, parmesan cheese
Arugula Pesto Pie

Homemade pesto, mozzarella, cheery tomatoes, Terrell Creek Feta, and arugula
White and Red

Homemade béchamel sauce with red sauce, summer squash, fresh oregano basil, mozzarella, City Butcher made Millsap raised Pepperoni 
Farmhouse Cheese

Marinara sauce all covered up with cheese

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Week 4 MILLSAP FARMS Summer CSA NEWSLETTER

Farm News: Why we choose to use organic practices

May 30, 2017

A few words about why we choose growing organic practices over synthetic chemical production.

When we got started in farming eleven years ago, we had an important decision to make; we could use synthetic chemicals like petroleum based fertilizer, pesticide, and herbicides,  or commit to using only organic practices to fertilize, control pests and weeds, and build our soil.

Sarah and I considered four things in making this decision;

  1. We both love the outdoors, floating on rivers, swimming in creeks, hiking in the hills, camping in the woods.  We value clean water, air, and soil for recreation and are concerned about the trend toward greater and greater degradation of these resources.
  2. Synthetic chemicals in our food concern us;  we would rather have our kale without a side of carbaryl (the active ingredient in Sevin).  These chemical pesticides have been presented to us as completely safe by those selling them, while the research has consistently shown that a diet which contain neurotoxins and endocrine disruptors is bad for us…
  3. We are convinced that we have been entrusted with the stewardship of this little piece of Creation by the Creator, and as his loving servants, we want to  steward in a way that builds diversity and resilience, which is the theme of organic agriculture.
  4. Finally, we have always wanted to live in such a way that our children can participate fully in our daily work and living, in line with our philosophy of parenting, which starts from the foundation that we hope to raise adults who know what it is to do valuable and noble work.

Taking all of this together, the choice to go organic was clear to us.   This of course has implications beyond these four considerations;  it sometimes means we don’t have easy solutions for conditions brought on by difficult weather (for example, the fungus and bacteria which killed our outside tomatoes in the summer of 2015).  It also means that weeds are our constant nemesis, so our weed management strategy must be much more diverse, complicated, and labor intensive than Round-Up.  On the other hand, it means that the water in the creek where we swim has fewer agricultural chemicals than it would if we were using synthetics, and it also means that sometimes we get treated to a swallowtail butterfly cruising through our carrot beds, laying a few eggs so there will be more swallowtails next season.  Is this a good or bad trade?  Good stewardship leads to more diversity and beauty, and so I’ll trade a few carrots for more splendid butterflies for my members and children to enjoy.

Thanks,
Farmer Curtis

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Garlic Scapes
Cucumbers
Summer Squash
Carrots
Head Lettuce
Radishes
Herb choice (basil, dill, cilantro, etc)
Radicchio
Cherry Tomatoes
Salad mix
Kale

Bread Share:
French Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:



Garlic Scapes
Cucumbers
Summer Squash
Carrots
Head Lettuce
Radishes
Herb choice (basil, dill, cilantro, etc)

Sampler Share:



Garlic Scapes
Cucumbers or Summer Squash
Carrots
Head Lettuce

Fruit Share:



Blueberries (conventional) from Caston Orchard Onia, AR

Notes & What do I do with….

Radishes:

  • Radish butter – grate the radishes, squeeze out the extra water, add melted butter, salt and pepper.  Add lots of radish butter to bread and enjoy! (or carrot sticks or cucumber slices)
  • Quick pickled radishes – super tasty and holds in the refrigerator for a while
  • Radish and cucumber salad – add some feta cheese and chickpeas too.

Garlic Scapes

  • Garlic scapes are the flower buds of the garlic.  when they are curly, they are tender and delicious.  Once they straighten up they get hard and stringy.
  • Stir fry them in a bit of olive oil and add salt and pepper.  (think asparagus)
  • use like green garlic or green onions
  • make pesto! (pesto will hold for a couple weeks in the fridge if you have a nice covering of olive oil on top –  or freeze it)
Balsamic-Grilled Radicchio with Shaved Pecorino 
Serves 4

  • 3 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/8 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 3 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1/2 teaspoon (packed) finely grated orange peel
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 2 large heads of radicchio, each quartered through core end
  • 1/2 cup Pecorino Romano cheese shavings
  1. Whisk oil, vinegar, garlic, rosemary, orange peel, and crushed red pepper in large bowl. Add radicchio and toss to coat. Marinate 15 minutes.
  2. Prepare barbecue (medium heat). Drain marinade into small bowl. Place radicchio on grill; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Grill radicchio until edges are crisp and slightly charred, turning occasionally, about 6 minutes. Transfer radicchio to serving platter. Drizzle with reserved marinade and sprinkle with cheese shavings.
Bacon & Squash Saute
Serves 4

  •  Bacon strips, diced
  • 2 small zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 2 small yellow summer squash, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced (can substitute garlic scapes)
  1. In a large skillet, cook bacon over medium heat until crisp; remove to paper towels. Drain, reserving 2 tablespoons drippings.
  2. In the drippings, saute the zucchini, yellow squash and onion for 6-8 minutes or until crisp-tender. Sprinkle with bacon.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew
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Summer CSA 3rd Week

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Harvesting SpringOnions for you this cloudy morning.

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

 W E B S I T E

Welcome to this weeks Summer CSA Newsletter for Millsap Farms. Today is the day to get your vegetables! (This Saturday for FMO pick ups).

Farm News: Welcome to our Farm!

May 23, 2017

A word why our veggies are nutrient dense and absolutely ripe:

Nutrients- You are receiving nutrient dense foods that have been harvested at the peak of their ripeness. We prioritize taste and nutritional quality over durability when choosing what to grow. We focus on the health of our soils by using cover crops and composted manure for fertilizers. This tends to yield crops with higher nutritional content. The roots of our crops grow deeper allowing them to more efficiently take up nutrients. Composted manures and other organic fertilizers release nutrients more slowly and over longer periods than synthetic chemical alternatives, which also enhances nutrient uptake of our plants.

Ripeness- We pick our veggies Tuesday, and if it is a labor intensive harvest, we may pick on Monday. So you are receiving the ripest veggies around. Keep them fresh by storing your greens in the fridge. The main aging factor for all of the items in your share this week and especially for greens is dehydration. So keep them in a plastic bag, but don’t seal it. This will allow just the right amount of airflow. Asparagus needs to sit in a small amount of water. Store them in your fridge. Enjoy your veggies! 

Thanks,

Sarah Millsap

 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Cucumber

Zucchini 

Head Lettuce

Kale

Spring Onions

Salad Turnips

Carrots

Asparagus

Basil

Arugula
Bread Share:

Marketplace Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Cucumber

Head Lettuce

Cherry Tomato

Kale

Spring Onions

Salad Turnips

Asparagus
Sampler Share:

Cucumber

Head Lettuce

Kale 

Notes & What do I do with….
Carrot Tops:
When you bring your carrots home, don’t store them with their tops still attached. The tops will pull moisture away from the vegetable. 

Soups and stock are great ways to use up any veggies and their parts. Since they will just boil away in the liquid, you don’t have to worry about overcooking them and any bitterness will be taken care of.

Salad Turnips (or Japanese Turnips)

These little white turnips are perfect sliced up raw in your salad. They are flavorful but not overwhelmingly turnipy.
You can also stir fry them with their greens, add to soups, and roast them. All tasty options!

Spring Onions

Spring onions are sweeter and mellower than regular onions, but the greens are more intense in flavor than scallions.
Young onion tops can be used almost anywhere you’d use scallions,


Easy Garlic Kale

 

Serves 4

1 bunch kale

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

Soak kale leaves in a large bowl of water until dirt and sand begin to fall to the bottom, about 2 minutes. Lift kale from the bowl without drying the leaves and immediately remove and discard stems. Chop the kale leaves into 1-inch pieces.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat; cook and stir garlic until sizzling, about 1 minute. Add kale to the skillet and place a cover over the top.
Cook, stirring occasionally with tongs, until kale is bright green and slightly tender, 5 to 7 minutes

Balsamic Grilled Zucchini

2 zucchinis, quartered lengthwise

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1 pinch salt

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Preheat grill for medium-low heat and lightly oil the grate.
Brush zucchini with olive oil. Sprinkle garlic powder, Italian seasoning, and salt over zucchini.
Cook on preheated grill until beginning to brown, 3-4 minutes per side. Brush balsamic vinegar over the zucchini and continue cooking for an additional minute. Serve immediately.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew
Copyright © 2017 Millsap Farms, All rights reserved 

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This is the 11th Winter CSA and the 2nd of three pickups for preseason Spring Greens shares. 

Farm News: Why we purchase our asparagus from other farmers (for now)…April 18, 2017

When we first started the farm, 10 years ago, we understood, at least academically, the importance of getting perennials, like fruit trees, rhubarb, and asparagus, into the ground early, so we could begin harvesting them as soon as possible (many of these things take several years to get to a size where you can harvest them). So one of our first tasks that first spring was to plant an asparagus patch by plowing out deep trenches, setting 500 asparagus crowns at the bottom, and then filling the trenches slowly over the following year to get back to a level field. Then we tended the young plants, without harvesting them, for two years. Finally, in the third year, we were able to harvest a small amount, and by the next year, we were harvesting quite a bit each week, enough to supply our CSA and take a little to market. Unfortunately, during the entire time we had this asparagus, we fought Johnson grass in our asparagus patch… this means that at least three times per season, we would get down on our hands and knees and crawl through the asparagus patch, wrestling Johnson grass rhizomes out of the ground, and hauling them away so they wouldn’t take root again. This became a Sisyphean task, with no real progress toward eradicating the weeds, only a stalemate. Eventually, last year, we decided that we had had enough, and it was time to remove the asparagus, destroy the Johnson grass with aggressive mowing and tillage, and transition the land into permanent beds, where we are currently raising head lettuce. We plan to prep land this summer for asparagus to be planted next spring, removing all perennial weed pressure before we plant a perennial crop. Meanwhile, for our sanity and morale, the asparagus in your shares will come from Dan Bigby and Sam Miller, who both had enough sense to get rid of the Johnson grass before planting their patches. Live and learn. And enjoy the asparagus.

Thanks,

Farmer Curtis

Next pickup May 2nd is our final Winter CSA and dinner is on us, we are making Pizza for all of you, see your note in your box. Sign up now for Summer CSA and never miss a week. 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Mini Romaine Head Lettuce

Salad Mix (Millsap Farm greens and Box Turtle Farm greens)

Zucchini

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield or Sam Miller’s farm )

Cucumbers

Basil (just a little taste)

Collards

Swiss Chard

Bok Choi

Green onions

Garlic

Carrots

Dragon Tounge Mustard Greens (Box Turtle Farms)

Herb choice

Bread Share:

Honey Whole Wheat by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Zucchini

Salad Mix (Millsap Farm greens and Box Turtle Greens)

Mini Romaine Head Lettuce

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield, Sam Miller’s Farm)

Cucumbers

Swiss Chard or Collards

Garlic
Sampler Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Zucchini

Salad Greens mix ( Millsap Farm greens & Box Turtle greens)

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield, Sam Miller’s Farm)

What do I do with….


Leeks

use like green onions, or substitute regular onions for a more mild delicate flavor.

Leeks and potato soup is good

Sautéed leeks with zucchini and basil is lovely
Collards:

Salad! or you can cook them, but chopped up fine in a salad adds a dark green, flavorful and nutritious element to lettuce.

Saute them

the traditional southern boiling with ham hocks and beans

these would make great greens wraps – for sandwiches or nut pates or whatever you want.

Mustard Greens:

Spicy if eaten raw, but mild if cooked. These are great lightly sautéed with a bit of garlic and vinegar or soy sauce sprinkled on right before serving.
Forest releasing Lady bugs. Using beneficial insects to eat some of our pest insects like aphids.

One Pot White Bean and Pasta with Leeks and Asparagus
Serves 4 

2 cups dried pasta (smaller shapes work well)

2 cups vegetable stock

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 cups leeks, chopped (1 large leek)

1 bunch of asparagus, ends trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces

juice of 1 lemon

1 cup gruyere or swiss cheese, shredded

19 oz white beans, drained and rinsed

In a medium pot, add the dried pasta, stock, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, leeks and asparagus.

Cover and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat, and cook (covered), stirring every 2 or so minutes, for 10 minutes or until pasta is cooked through.

Remove from heat and add the lemon juice, cheese and white beans. Stir until the cheese is melted through and serve.

(from Sweet Peas and Saffron)

 

Collard Salad
1 bunch of collards

1 bunch of kale

1 tart apple

Fennel fronds, carrots, radishes (optional)

5 oz feta cheese

walnuts or pumpkin seeds

olive oil

raisins or craisins

balsamic vinaigrette
De-stem collards and kale. Roll leaves together into a log of sorts. Thinly slice into narrow ribbons. (1/4 inch) Add a little olive oil and massage until all greens are coated with oil. Chop apple, fennel and any other veggies you want to add (carrots and radishes work well here). Add walnuts (toasted if you want) or pumpkin seeds, raisins and crumbled feta cheese. Toss with a balsamic vinaigrette and serve! (you can add hard boiled eggs to this too if you like)
 

Hummus Collard Wraps

2 collard leaves

½ cup basil pesto hummus

10 asparagus spears, roasted or raw

½ cup cucumber, peeled and sliced into short thin strips

1-2 carrots, peeled and sliced into short thin strips

½ cup zucchini, sliced into short thin strips

½ cup radish, sliced into short thin strips

½ cup red cabbage, sliced thin

½ avocado

micro greens, sprouts or baby greens
Wash and dry collard leaves and then use a paring knife to shave down the stems. This will make them much easier to fold.

 

Place collard leaves on a flat surface, spread ¼ cup of hummus near the top/middle of each leaf, fill each leaf with the remaining veggies, splitting each amount between the two wraps. Wrap the leaves as you would a burrito. Cut each wrap in half and enjoy.
Makes 2 wraps. (from Eating Bird Food)

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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