Summer CSA Shares are now available

Click here to JOIN NOW!

How does it work?

What is a CSA?

Millsap Farm’s CSA is a partnership between the member and the farmer that helps sustain local access to fresh produce. CSA members support the farmer, giving them an opportunity to responsibly care for the earth and provide healthy, locally grown produce. The CSA member picks up their share of the fresh, contamination free vegetables and herbs on the day of harvest. Read More…

Where and when do I get my produce?

You have 4 options for pickup:

Tuesdays; Starting May 9, ending October 17

  • Pick up at Millsap Farms Buffet Style Pick up, Tuesdays 4 – 6 pm
    • 6593 N Emu Lane, Springfield, MO 65803
    • Click Here For Map
  • Delivery to Your Door, Tuesdays 3:30-8 pm
    • Springfield/Nixa City Limits Only
      • $6 -$7/Week Charge
      • One-time $14 Container Fee
  • Rountree Neighborhood Tuesday 4-6
    • 1019 S Kentwood Rountree neighborhood
      • $3/week Charge
      • One-time $14 Container Fee
  • Farmers Market of the Ozarks Saturday 8 -1
    • 2144 E Republic Rd at our farmers market booth
      • $2 fee

What Do I Get?

CSA share April 212-24-15 CSA Full Share

The pictures above are from actual shares. Each harvest is different depending on weather patterns and plant performance. We make every effort to provide you with a plentiful harvest. This page will show you some posts listing the shares received in previous harvests.

Will It Be Enough To Feed My Family? *

FULL SHARE – 12-14 items (Feeds 2-4 adults, or a small family) $675
HALF SHARE – 10-12 items (Feeds 2 adults) $390
SAMPLER SHARE – 6-8 items (Feeds 1) $255

What Will I Be Doing For My Work Share?

Each member will work 12 hours each season**.  The work is diverse and variable, but here are a few things you could be doing during your work share:

  • Washing, sorting and packing produce with farmers for the pickup
  • Harvesting
  • Planting
  • Weeding
  • Watering
  • Transplanting
  • Construction

JOIN OUR CSA!

*The quantities listed are what we strive to fulfill. This is not a guarantee. CSA is a risk-sharing venture.
**You may buy out of your work share for $100.

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Summer CSA 3rd Week

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Harvesting SpringOnions for you this cloudy morning.

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

 W E B S I T E

Welcome to this weeks Summer CSA Newsletter for Millsap Farms. Today is the day to get your vegetables! (This Saturday for FMO pick ups).

Farm News: Welcome to our Farm!

May 23, 2017

A word why our veggies are nutrient dense and absolutely ripe:

Nutrients- You are receiving nutrient dense foods that have been harvested at the peak of their ripeness. We prioritize taste and nutritional quality over durability when choosing what to grow. We focus on the health of our soils by using cover crops and composted manure for fertilizers. This tends to yield crops with higher nutritional content. The roots of our crops grow deeper allowing them to more efficiently take up nutrients. Composted manures and other organic fertilizers release nutrients more slowly and over longer periods than synthetic chemical alternatives, which also enhances nutrient uptake of our plants.

Ripeness- We pick our veggies Tuesday, and if it is a labor intensive harvest, we may pick on Monday. So you are receiving the ripest veggies around. Keep them fresh by storing your greens in the fridge. The main aging factor for all of the items in your share this week and especially for greens is dehydration. So keep them in a plastic bag, but don’t seal it. This will allow just the right amount of airflow. Asparagus needs to sit in a small amount of water. Store them in your fridge. Enjoy your veggies! 

Thanks,

Sarah Millsap

 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Cucumber

Zucchini 

Head Lettuce

Kale

Spring Onions

Salad Turnips

Carrots

Asparagus

Basil

Arugula
Bread Share:

Marketplace Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Cucumber

Head Lettuce

Cherry Tomato

Kale

Spring Onions

Salad Turnips

Asparagus
Sampler Share:

Cucumber

Head Lettuce

Kale 

Notes & What do I do with….
Carrot Tops:
When you bring your carrots home, don’t store them with their tops still attached. The tops will pull moisture away from the vegetable. 

Soups and stock are great ways to use up any veggies and their parts. Since they will just boil away in the liquid, you don’t have to worry about overcooking them and any bitterness will be taken care of.

Salad Turnips (or Japanese Turnips)

These little white turnips are perfect sliced up raw in your salad. They are flavorful but not overwhelmingly turnipy.
You can also stir fry them with their greens, add to soups, and roast them. All tasty options!

Spring Onions

Spring onions are sweeter and mellower than regular onions, but the greens are more intense in flavor than scallions.
Young onion tops can be used almost anywhere you’d use scallions,


Easy Garlic Kale

 

Serves 4

1 bunch kale

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

Soak kale leaves in a large bowl of water until dirt and sand begin to fall to the bottom, about 2 minutes. Lift kale from the bowl without drying the leaves and immediately remove and discard stems. Chop the kale leaves into 1-inch pieces.
Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat; cook and stir garlic until sizzling, about 1 minute. Add kale to the skillet and place a cover over the top.
Cook, stirring occasionally with tongs, until kale is bright green and slightly tender, 5 to 7 minutes

Balsamic Grilled Zucchini

2 zucchinis, quartered lengthwise

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon Italian seasoning

1 pinch salt

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Preheat grill for medium-low heat and lightly oil the grate.
Brush zucchini with olive oil. Sprinkle garlic powder, Italian seasoning, and salt over zucchini.
Cook on preheated grill until beginning to brown, 3-4 minutes per side. Brush balsamic vinegar over the zucchini and continue cooking for an additional minute. Serve immediately.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew
Copyright © 2017 Millsap Farms, All rights reserved 

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This is the 11th Winter CSA and the 2nd of three pickups for preseason Spring Greens shares. 

Farm News: Why we purchase our asparagus from other farmers (for now)…April 18, 2017

When we first started the farm, 10 years ago, we understood, at least academically, the importance of getting perennials, like fruit trees, rhubarb, and asparagus, into the ground early, so we could begin harvesting them as soon as possible (many of these things take several years to get to a size where you can harvest them). So one of our first tasks that first spring was to plant an asparagus patch by plowing out deep trenches, setting 500 asparagus crowns at the bottom, and then filling the trenches slowly over the following year to get back to a level field. Then we tended the young plants, without harvesting them, for two years. Finally, in the third year, we were able to harvest a small amount, and by the next year, we were harvesting quite a bit each week, enough to supply our CSA and take a little to market. Unfortunately, during the entire time we had this asparagus, we fought Johnson grass in our asparagus patch… this means that at least three times per season, we would get down on our hands and knees and crawl through the asparagus patch, wrestling Johnson grass rhizomes out of the ground, and hauling them away so they wouldn’t take root again. This became a Sisyphean task, with no real progress toward eradicating the weeds, only a stalemate. Eventually, last year, we decided that we had had enough, and it was time to remove the asparagus, destroy the Johnson grass with aggressive mowing and tillage, and transition the land into permanent beds, where we are currently raising head lettuce. We plan to prep land this summer for asparagus to be planted next spring, removing all perennial weed pressure before we plant a perennial crop. Meanwhile, for our sanity and morale, the asparagus in your shares will come from Dan Bigby and Sam Miller, who both had enough sense to get rid of the Johnson grass before planting their patches. Live and learn. And enjoy the asparagus.

Thanks,

Farmer Curtis

Next pickup May 2nd is our final Winter CSA and dinner is on us, we are making Pizza for all of you, see your note in your box. Sign up now for Summer CSA and never miss a week. 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Mini Romaine Head Lettuce

Salad Mix (Millsap Farm greens and Box Turtle Farm greens)

Zucchini

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield or Sam Miller’s farm )

Cucumbers

Basil (just a little taste)

Collards

Swiss Chard

Bok Choi

Green onions

Garlic

Carrots

Dragon Tounge Mustard Greens (Box Turtle Farms)

Herb choice

Bread Share:

Honey Whole Wheat by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Zucchini

Salad Mix (Millsap Farm greens and Box Turtle Greens)

Mini Romaine Head Lettuce

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield, Sam Miller’s Farm)

Cucumbers

Swiss Chard or Collards

Garlic
Sampler Share:

Spinach

Leeks

Zucchini

Salad Greens mix ( Millsap Farm greens & Box Turtle greens)

Kale

Asparagus (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield, Sam Miller’s Farm)

What do I do with….


Leeks

use like green onions, or substitute regular onions for a more mild delicate flavor.

Leeks and potato soup is good

Sautéed leeks with zucchini and basil is lovely
Collards:

Salad! or you can cook them, but chopped up fine in a salad adds a dark green, flavorful and nutritious element to lettuce.

Saute them

the traditional southern boiling with ham hocks and beans

these would make great greens wraps – for sandwiches or nut pates or whatever you want.

Mustard Greens:

Spicy if eaten raw, but mild if cooked. These are great lightly sautéed with a bit of garlic and vinegar or soy sauce sprinkled on right before serving.
Forest releasing Lady bugs. Using beneficial insects to eat some of our pest insects like aphids.

One Pot White Bean and Pasta with Leeks and Asparagus
Serves 4 

2 cups dried pasta (smaller shapes work well)

2 cups vegetable stock

¼ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon pepper

¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

3 cups leeks, chopped (1 large leek)

1 bunch of asparagus, ends trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces

juice of 1 lemon

1 cup gruyere or swiss cheese, shredded

19 oz white beans, drained and rinsed

In a medium pot, add the dried pasta, stock, salt, pepper, red pepper flakes, leeks and asparagus.

Cover and bring to a boil.

Reduce heat, and cook (covered), stirring every 2 or so minutes, for 10 minutes or until pasta is cooked through.

Remove from heat and add the lemon juice, cheese and white beans. Stir until the cheese is melted through and serve.

(from Sweet Peas and Saffron)

 

Collard Salad
1 bunch of collards

1 bunch of kale

1 tart apple

Fennel fronds, carrots, radishes (optional)

5 oz feta cheese

walnuts or pumpkin seeds

olive oil

raisins or craisins

balsamic vinaigrette
De-stem collards and kale. Roll leaves together into a log of sorts. Thinly slice into narrow ribbons. (1/4 inch) Add a little olive oil and massage until all greens are coated with oil. Chop apple, fennel and any other veggies you want to add (carrots and radishes work well here). Add walnuts (toasted if you want) or pumpkin seeds, raisins and crumbled feta cheese. Toss with a balsamic vinaigrette and serve! (you can add hard boiled eggs to this too if you like)
 

Hummus Collard Wraps

2 collard leaves

½ cup basil pesto hummus

10 asparagus spears, roasted or raw

½ cup cucumber, peeled and sliced into short thin strips

1-2 carrots, peeled and sliced into short thin strips

½ cup zucchini, sliced into short thin strips

½ cup radish, sliced into short thin strips

½ cup red cabbage, sliced thin

½ avocado

micro greens, sprouts or baby greens
Wash and dry collard leaves and then use a paring knife to shave down the stems. This will make them much easier to fold.

 

Place collard leaves on a flat surface, spread ¼ cup of hummus near the top/middle of each leaf, fill each leaf with the remaining veggies, splitting each amount between the two wraps. Wrap the leaves as you would a burrito. Cut each wrap in half and enjoy.
Makes 2 wraps. (from Eating Bird Food)

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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Welcome to Spring CSA shares heading home

This is the 10th Winter CSA and the First of three pickups for preseason shares. (Farmers Market Pick up this Saturday)
Start thinking about our CSA appreciation dinner held on the last Tuesday pickup – May 2. Details to come.

Farm News: Welcome to Spring

April 4, 2017

This is the time of year when we are planting like crazy, trying to get as much in the ground as we can, hoping to harvest early veggies, from tomatoes to arugula. At the same time we are hedging our bets, providing a protective environment for the seedlings going into the field. Our memories are not as long as some, but they are long enough to know that warm weather in February and March doesn’t mean that we are done with wintery weather entirely, or that we won’t have torrential rains and hail. Part of our job as your farmers is to give our crops every advantage they can have, within an organic framework, thereby ensuring the best possible variety and supply of vegetables. One of the ways we do this is by building covered growing space. On Millsap Farm, this takes three forms; structural greenhouses, high tunnels, and caterpillar tunnels. Last week we were pulling plastic back onto one of our caterpillar tunnels: this is a 150’ long, 22’ wide set of pipe hoops, covered with re-used plastic (plastic we took off of other greenhouses because it was no longer serviceable on those structures). This structure has several benefits for the farm; first is that it provides dry soil regardless of outside conditions, so we don’t have to wait for the soil to dry out from one rain after another. Secondly, it will protect tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant from hail, wind, and rain, all of which cause damage to the plants and fruit, so we will have higher yields of higher quality fruit. For example, in 2015, when it rained more in the three months of summer than we usually get in 7 months of the year, the tomatoes and peppers under cover were the only ones that produced tomatoes for more than a couple of weeks; the other 1,000 plants in the field wilted under the disease pressure caused by the constant leaf wetness. Finally, it gives us a space to work when the weather outside is not favorable for working. So as these spring rain storms continue, we have a dry space to plant our early tomatoes into, rather than wading around in the puddles and mud in the field. It’s always an adventure out here, and I’m sure these caterpillar tunnels will supply a few new wild stories, but so far so good, and we are excited about the possibilities. 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers,

Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, Erick, Elsa, Ella, Colby, Emma, David, Catilyn and all the other crew at Millsap Farm.  

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Cooking Spinach

Green Onions or Leeks

Zucchini

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Mathews Family Farm, AR)

Garlic

Salad Greens mix (Naturally grown – Urban Roots Farm & Millsap Farm greens)

Kale

Sage or Rosemary

Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish at Rich Hill, MO)

Carrots

Radicchio

Bread Share:

French Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Note: sage flowers can be used just like the leaves

Half Share:

Cooking Spinach

Green Onions or Leeks

Zucchini

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Mathews Family Farm, AR)

Garlic

Salad Greens mix (Naturally grown – Urban Roots Farm & Millsap Farm greens)

Kale

Sage or Rosemary

Beets

Sampler Share:

Cooking Spinach

Green Onions or Leeks

Zucchini

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Mathews Family Farm, AR)

Garlic

Salad Greens mix (Naturally grown – Urban Roots Farm & Millsap Farm greens)

Beets

What do I do with….

Radicchio

Radicchio is a bitter Italian green. Related to lettuce, this green can be eaten raw or cooked.

Try grilling, roasting or sautéing

Chop a little up in a salad – or dedicate an entire salad to Radicchio (just make sure you include lots of olive oil, balsamic vinegar and parmesan cheese to help balance the bitter aspects)

So Much Spinach:

Why so much spinach this week? We are clearing out our caterpillar tunnel that has been growing spinach for us non-stop this winter. We need the space for spring greens – and the spinach, after working hard since September, is finally starting to bolt or flower – which means it’s not going to be around much longer. (don’t worry – we have spring spinach planted to get us though May!) This also means its great for cooking spinach, but not quite as sweet as we like our spinach to be for things like salads.

Freeze it! The most common way is to bring a big pot of water to a boil, submerge spinach and blanch for 2 minutes, immediately transferring to ice water to stop the cooking. Drain out all the water and place in a freezer bag. Squeeze out all the air to prevent freezer burn, label and freeze. I have also seen ways to freeze spinach without blanching and as a puree.  

Make Greek Spinach Pie (Spanakopita)

Spinach Lasagna

Palak Paneer or Saag Paneer (see recipe in this newsletter)

Spinach Pesto

Sautéed Spinach with garlic and soy sauce

Green Onion Pesto (Pete’s Greens of Vermont)

Try making some scallion pesto and using it with different dishes this week. It could be used as a pasta sauce (blend in some tasty hard crumbled cheese), but would also be nice on fish, or mixed with mayo for a sandwich spread. Using less oil will result in a thicker pesto, one that can be formed as a garnish. Using more oil will result in a more sauce like pesto. I had some this week mixed with blue cheese on pasta. It was pretty darn good.

One big bunch of scallions – trimmed to remove the white bottoms (you only want the less assertive greens here)

1/4 cup sunflower seeds

juice of 1-2 limes

1 clove of garlic

1/4 – 1 cup of sunflower oil (or any mild tasting oil)

Salt to taste

Chop the green onions roughly and toss into the blender along with the nuts, the garlic and the lime juice. Turn on the motor and drizzle in the oil until the desired consistency is reached. Season to taste with salt

Variations :

try it with olive oil and lemon

try it with different nuts

mix it with sour cream for veggie dip

toss it on hot pasta

keep it thick and spread on toasted crusty bread sandwiches

toss it with simply steamed new potatoes

use it for a 10 minute dinner as a coating for simply broiled white fish fillets

Palak Paneer (Spinach Curry)

6 tablespoons olive oil

2-4 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger, divided

2 dried red chili peppers

½ cup finely chopped onion

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoon ground coriander

1 teaspoon ground turmeric (or grated fresh)

¾ cup sour cream (or yogurt or whipping cream)

2-3 pounds spinach, torn 

1 large tomato, quartered (I used canned)

4 sprigs fresh cilantro 

8 ounces ricotta cheese or paneer

sea salt to taste

1. In a large saucepan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil and saute garlic, 1/2 tablespoon of ginger, red chilies (optional ingredient) and onion until brown. Mix in the cumin, coriander, turmeric and sour cream (add more or less to achieve desired creaminess). Add the spinach, handfuls at a time until it is cooked down, about 15 minutes total. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly. (If I’making this for a crowd, I blanch the spinach separately then drain and add to the yogurt mix)

2. Pour spinach mixture into a blender or food processor and add the tomato, the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of ginger, and cilantro (add more or less according to taste). Blend for 15 to 30 seconds, or until the spinach is finely chopped. Pour back into the saucepan and keep warm over low heat. You can also use an immersion blender.

3. In a medium frying pan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat, and fry cheese until browned; drain and add to spinach. Cook for 10 minutes on low heat. Season with salt to taste.

(you can also use chicken instead of cheese or include some hard boiled eggs)

Radicchio Salad with Green Olives & Parmesan

 ” It was the most glamorous grown-up salad I’ve ever eaten, and my husband and I tussled over the final bites.” – the kitchn

Serves 4 

1 small head red radicchio

1 cup Castelvetrano olives, brine reserved

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon aged balsamic vinegar 

1 tablespoon honey, optional 

About 2 ounces Parmesan or Grana Padano cheese

Flaky salt and freshly ground black pepper

Core the radicchio and discard any browned outer leaves. Tear the leaves into bite-sized pieces and put them in a large bowl.

Pit the olives and cut each one in half lengthwise. Smash each lightly with the flat of a knife, to flatten. Toss the olives with the radicchio, massaging the leaves lightly with your hands.

Whisk together the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and 1 tablespoon olive brine. Taste for sweetness, and add a drizzle or more of honey if desired. Toss the dressing with the radicchio.

Use a vegetable peeler to create large, thick flakes of cheese and toss with the salad, along with salt and pepper to taste. Serve within an hour, garnished with additional cheese if desired.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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Season Passes for Thursday Night Pizza Club are now on sale

New this year we are offering the convenience of a season pass at last years cost! These are only available for sale through April.  Never worry about us selling out, Season Pass holders are always welcome.  Also available is an optional Companion Season Pass ticket. This is good for anyone the named season pass holder wants to bring. (how fun, you could spoil your friends by taking turns and bringing them out to the farm all season long). Grab them while you can the sale of these end April 30th.

If you would like to join us for our Thursday night Millsap Farm Pizza Club, please sign up here.   As long as there is still room, you are welcome to come, we sold out every week last summer so you might want to consider a season pass.  Adult season pass is $312 for 2017.

wpid-fb_img_1440189148673.jpgAdults are $14($14-$5 per adult is a non-refundable reservation fee=$9 at the door), Kids 4-12 years $5 at the door , 3 and under are free, $4.50 per Gluten Free Crust at the door.   All tickets reservations are made online. If you need to reach us Sarah cell is 417-773-1989.

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9th winter CSA and the arrival of zucchini 


MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

The view of the farm from above


MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE
 W E B S I T E

This is the ninth Winter CSA!   

Farm News: Soil Prep on Millsap Farm

March 21, 2017

1st day of Spring Swim in the creek


We’ve been busy the past couple of months getting our soil prepped for the season. This means making additions, subtractions, and modifications to our existing soil. 

 

We’ve been adding Rabbit Manure, Compost, and Organic Fertilizers made of composted chicken litter, mined minerals, corn gluten, and alfalfa. These additions are things we put into our soil to boost the biological activity of the soil by increasing the organic matter and nutrients in the soil (in the case of the manure and fertilizer), and by increasing the diversity of the biological agents in the soil (in the case of the compost). Both of these types of additions are long-term investments in our soil, building structure, tilth (the ability of a soil to stick together like chocolate cake, rather than modeling clay) and resiliency to excess or insufficient water. What this means in shorthand is that we are preparing our soil to stay put and support plant life. Unfortunately, good soil supports both desirable and undesirable plants, which brings us to subtractions.

 

We’ve been working at reducing the weeds in our soil. We do this in several ways, but the primary technique we use in the off season is occultation, using black tarps to block the light from the surface of the soil. The strategy here is to provide the weeds with two out of the three things they need to grow; warmth and moisture, but not light. The tarp helps keep the moisture at the surface, and warms the soil by holding in heat from the sun, encouraging all those thousands of weed seeds to sprout… but when they break the surface, it’s dark, and they die within a week or two. This means that when we pull the tarps off to seed tiny seeds like carrots, lettuces, or arugula, as long as we don’t disturb the soil more than necessary, we have a clean seedbed that’s warm and moist, ready grow weed-free veggies. Of course, to get to this point, we’ve done quite a bit of modification to the soils from their resting state.

 

Soil Modification, in terms of bed preparation, is largely a matter of stirring the soil with our S tine cultivator, bed shaper, and rototiller, all pulled behind our two tractors. The goal here is to introduce more oxygen into the soil, warming it and accelerating the pace of the microbiological processes. We also use bed shapers to create beds which will drain and dry more quickly that the surrounding soil, which is helpful this time of year, when the soil is prone to stay muddy and cold.

 

Altogether it makes for a busy time of the year, balancing all these activities with ongoing planting, weeding, harvesting, and marketing. Speaking of marketing, if you haven’t done it yet, now is a great time to sign up for the CSA. Your membership helps to recognize the impact all of the CSA members across the country are having on the movement toward a more sustainable, life-affirming, community friendly form of agriculture.
Thank you for the privilege of being your farmers. 

Curtis and Sarah, with Kimby, Cammie, David, Elsa, Julie, Erick, Erick, Adam, Emma, Ken, Hazel, and the many more community members who contribute to our mission to raise excellent food for you. 

Msu high tunnel class with Jennifer Morgenthaler

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Head Lettuce

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthews Family Farm, AR)

Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO)

Zucchini

Elephant Garlic

Japanese Turnips

Kale

Swiss Chard

Chioggia Beets

Potatoes – ??

Leeks

Rosemary

Bread Share:

Market Place Bread – made by Emma and Anna Millsap

 

Half Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Head Lettuce

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthews Family Farm, AR)

Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO)

Zucchini

Elephant Garlic

Japanese Turnips

Kale or Swiss Chard
Sample Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Head Lettuce

Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthews Family Farm, AR)

Zucchini

Elephant Garlic

Japanese Turnips

 

Piggy are growing fast


Help! I have 6 butternut squash staring at me in my kitchen!
It’s that time of year – the butternut squash just keep coming! Here’s some tried and true recipe ideas to use up that squash (we eat A LOT of butternut squash here on the farm!)
These are all recipes we have posted on our blog – i’m linking them here so you can click right over, but searching Butternut Squash at http://www.millsapfarms.com will also get you to these recipes.
Butternut Squash and Spinach Lasagna 

– use your spinach and butternut in this recipe – a delicious twist on Lasagna

Butternut Squash sheet cake with brown sugar cream frosting

 – it’s sweet and healthy(ier)!

Savory Butternut Squash and Black Bean Burritos

 – a lovely combination!

Butternut Squash Corn Bread

 – this goes great with

Chipotle Butternut Chili

 (Featured last fall at the CSA appreciation dinner)

Chilean Butternut Squash Casserole

 – try this dish of squash, corn, peppers and cheese!

————————————

A Simple Roasted Butternut Squash Salad (ohsheglows.com)

Yield: 4 to 6 servings
Ingredients:

For the roasted butternut squash:

1 large butternut squash (about 3-3.5lb) peeled, seeded, and diced (1/2-inch cubes, 8-9 cups chopped)

2 tablespoons melted coconut oil, or oil of choice

Fine sea salt, to taste

For the salad:

1 cup uncooked quinoa

1 large avocado, pitted and chopped

Fresh lemon or lime juice, to taste

Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:

For the squash: Preheat the oven to 400F and line two large baking sheets with parchment paper.

Spread the chopped squash onto the baking sheets and drizzle on 1 tablespoon of oil over top each. Toss to coat. Spread the squash into an even layer, being careful not to overcrowd the squash, and garnish with a few pinches of sea salt.

Roast the squash until the bottoms are just starting to brown. For my oven, this takes about 50 minutes, but your time may vary. I recommend checking on it after 30 minutes, and then every 5-10 minutes after that. I don’t bother flipping it halfway through, but I do rotate the pans once half way through roasting as I have a hot spot in my oven. I find the squash tastes best when the bottoms are slightly browned (more than the photo shows).

For the salad: Prepare the quinoa once you have about 25 minutes left of roasting the squash. Rinse the quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and transfer to a medium pot. Add 1 3/4 cups water and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium, cover with a tight-fitting lid, and cook for 13-16 minutes, until the water is absorbed and the quinoa is tender and fluffy. Once cooked, fluff with a fork and remove from heat. Season the quinoa to taste with a generous amount of salt and pepper and stir to combine. Keep the lid on until ready to use so it stays warm.

Pit and chop the avocado and have it ready to go just before assembly.

When the squash is finished cooking, spread the warm quinoa onto a platter (or you can simply combine everything in a large bowl). Top the quinoa with all of the (hot out of the oven) roasted squash, and finally the chopped avocado. Garnish with a couple more pinches of salt, and a small amount of fresh lemon juice (or lime juice) drizzled over top (or you can try lemon or lime zest for a twist). I use a light touch with lemon juice as it can quickly overwhelm the other flavors. Serve immediately.

Tips:

Want to change this dish up? Here are some ideas on how you can create a new dish!

– Add some minced garlic to the cooked quinoa for a subtle garlic flavour

– Sprinkle on some garlic powder or nutritional yeast

– Add black beans, chickpeas, or any bean of choice for a boost of protein

– Try experimenting with spices like cumin + chili powder + cayenne; cinnamon + nutmeg; curry powder + coriander, etc.

– Switch it up and use lemon juice instead of lime juice, and vice versa

– Try sprinkling fresh minced herbs to finish, such as parsley or cilantro

– Switch up the grains – I think a small amount of rice would pair really well here

– Add finely shredded kale, chard, or spinach for a boost of green power
————————————

Glazed Hakurei Turnips

– Bon Appetit 

10 SERVINGS

3 bunches baby hakurei turnips, baby turnips, or red radishes (about 2 pounds), trimmed, greens reserved

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter

3 tablespoons sugar

Kosher salt

Place turnips in a large skillet; add water to cover turnips halfway. Add butter, sugar, and a large pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until liquid is syrupy and turnips are tender, about 15 minutes. (If turnips are tender before liquid has reduced, use a slotted spoon to transfer turnips to a plate and reduce liquid until syrupy. Return turnips to pan and stir to coat well.) DO AHEAD: Can be made 4 hours ahead. Let stand at room temperature. Rewarm before continuing.
Add turnip greens to skillet and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until just wilted, 2–3 minutes. Season with salt.
————————————

Savory Sweet Potato and Apple Bake

– 1 large sweet potato (the baby sized one you got in your share!) but into 1 inch cubes (it’s not necessary to peel them – only if you want too!)

– 2 to 3 tart apples – granny smith type, cut into 1 inch cubes

– 1 to 2 teaspoons diced fresh rosemary (sage or thyme are also good here)

– 1 red onion, chopped

– 2 Tablespoons or as needed olive oil

– salt and pepper to taste
Mix potatoes, rosemary, onion, olive oil, and pepper. Spread evening over a cookie sheet and roast for 25 minutes at 425 degrees. Add apples, gently stir and roast some more until apples are tender and sweet potatoes are caramelizing. (you can drop the temp to 400 when you put the apples in if you like.)

Sprinkle salt over the potatoes before you serve them!
note: the smaller you chop the potatoes, the quicker they will cook!

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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7th Winter CSA share-News on the Farm

Welcome to Millsap Farms Winter CSA Harvest List and Newsletter!View this email in your browser


MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Ella and Julie harvesting lovely red radishes this morning. 

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE


 W E B S I T E

This is the seventh Winter CSA! Remember – sign ups are open for Summer CSA starting in May – please get your name in as spots are steadily filling up!

Farm News: Spring Things

February 21, 2017

Spring has sprung on the farm! The grass is green, the trees are budding, and the seeds are sprouting… we’ve been busy the past couple of weeks, planting onions, head lettuce, kohlrabi, squash (in the greenhouse), and thousands of seedlings. The seedling table heat and the sunny days keep our supply of seedlings chugging along, while we spread compost, till, lay bio-degradable mulch, and seed cover crops in the paths. The willow trees are making leaves (hopeless optimists that they are), while the apples have so far refrained from flowering (good thing too, as I’m certain we will have more cold weather before spring truly arrives). Meanwhile, we’ve also been welcoming a new crop of interns to the farm; Julie Jacobs (who has actually been with us for over a month now, after studying and working on farms in Israel and Palestine), Erick Gonzalez (who hails from California, via Arkansas, having worked with Heifer Ranch), and Elsa Venne (who is coming from Connecticut via upstate New York). All three are hard working, intelligent, fun and fascinating people; I encourage you to get to know them this season as you pick up your veggies and contribute your work share hours. We’ll profile each of our farm crew after the summer season starts, to give you a chance to understand who is helping grow your food. We love sharing what we do, and also enjoy the influx of fresh hands, making the daily work a little more manageable. For now, enjoy the bountiful greens, carrots, beets, and radishes from an early spring, and rejoice with us in the beautiful weather to work and grow in. We aren’t guaranteed anything, but we are grateful for the abundance of beauty that we receive, and the bountiful harvest we reap.

Thanks,

Farmer Curtis

 
This anemone beauty was picked this morning! Remember you can sign up for a flower bouquet share for Summer CSA as well!

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Colorado Rose Potatoes – Organically grown by Alex Wood, Higginsville, MO

Red Radishes

Head Lettuce

Elephant Garlic

Beets

Turmeric

Butternut Squash – Conventionally grown by Amish growers in Rich Hill, MO

Herb choice (Dill, Cilantro, Rosemary)

Celeriac

Salad mix (Arugula, Tokyo Bekana)

Radishes

Choice of Asian bunching greens (Senposai or Flowering Bok Choi)


Bread Share:

Honey Whole Wheat brought to you by Emma & Anna Millsap

 

Half Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Colorado Rose Potatoes – Organically grown by Alex Wood, Higginsville, MO

Red Radishes

Head Lettuce

Elephant Garlic

Beets

Turmeric

Butternut Squash – Conventionally grown by Amish growers in Rich Hill, MO
Sampler Share:

Spinach

Carrots

Colorado Rose Potatoes – Organically grown by Alex Wood, Higginsville, MO

Red Radishes

Head Lettuce

Elephant Garlic

What do I do with….

More Turmeric!

This will be the last of the turmeric until next fall – so feel free to freeze it – it grates well frozen. If you juice it – freeze it in the serving size you want to juice. (just put it in a freezer bag and throw in the freezer, no special prep needed)

Add it to soups, curries, juices, fermented veggies, oatmeal…whatever you like!
Beets and Greens:

Beets are small today, but their greens are lovely – beet greens are edible! 

Because of their small size, I recommending cutting the beets in half and roasting them (you don’t have to peel roasted beets!)

The greens are great raw, sliced very thin, or you can par boil the to make them a little more tender and add them to a salad – I’ll include on of my favorite beet green salad recipes in the recipe section.

To store for a while, cut the greens from the beets and keep them separately – the beets will be fine at the bottom your produce drawer in your fridge – the greens would like a plastic bag.

Elephant Garlic:

This is similar to garlic but with very large cloves! The cloves are more mild than garlic – so even though they are at least twice as large – use interchangeably with regular garlic in a recipe – so if you recipe calls for 1 clove of regular garlic, use 1 clove of elephant garlic.  

Roasted Elephant Garlic is delicious!

What is Senposai?:

An asian cooking green. You can treat it the same way as Kale or Collards. It can be eaten raw in a salad, or cooked.

I recently added it to spaghetti and it cooked down beautifully and tasted like spinach. It was more tender cooked than I was expecting.

Roasted Winter Vegetables

Serves 8

1 pound carrots

1 pound parsnips (sub beets, celeariac, potatoes or just add all of these)

1 large sweet potato (peeled if you prefer)

1 small butternut squash, peeled and seeded (about 2 pounds)

2 tablespoons good police oil

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

2 tablespoons chopped parsley (rosemary, thyme and sage are also yummy!)

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

Cut the carrots, parsnips, sweet potato, and butternut squash in 1 to 1 1/4-inch cubes. All the vegetables will shrink while baking, so don’t cut them too small.

Place all the cut vegetables in a single layer on 2 baking sheets. Drizzle them with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Toss well. Bake for 30 to 45 minutes, until all the vegetables are tender, turning once with a metal spatula.

Sprinkle with parsley, season to taste, and serve hot.

Luscious Beet Salad with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds

Makes 6 servings

Salad:

4 large beets (or many small beets)

1/4 cup pumpkin seeds toasted

1 bunch beet greens

2 scallions, finely chopped (or green onions or thinly sliced bulb onion)

1/4 lb feta cheese (or more – optional)

Dressing:

3 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1/4 teaspoon Dijon Mustard

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 tablespoon fresh basil (or 1 teaspoon dried)

Wash beets and remove tops. Place beets in a large pot filled with water and bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer until beets are tender. Set aside to cool.

Toast pumpkin seeds by placing seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat. Move the skillet back and forth over the heat with one hand; stir the seeds using a wooden spoon with the other hand. This will toast the seeds evenly and prevent burning. When seeds begin to pop and give off a nutty aroma they are ready. Remove seeds from skillet and set aside.

To prepare beet greens, bring a large pot of water to boil. Wash beet greens by submerging bunch in a sink full of cold water. Shake off water and chop the bunch into bite-sized pieces. Drop greens into boil water and let it cook for about 30 seconds, just enough to make the stems tender. Place greens in a colander and run cold water over them to halt cooking.

Place all dressing ingredients in a jar and shake well. Peel beets (if you want) and cut into small cubes. Squeeze excess water out of the cooked beet greens. Put cubed beets, greens, pumpkin seeds and scallions in a salad bowl. Pour dressing over salad and toss gently. Crumble feta cheese on top. Serve at room temperature.

(Feeding the Whole Family – Cynthia Lair)

– can roast beets instead of boiling them

– can substitute beet greens for kale or asian bunching greens, can also add raw spinach to make more salad.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew
Copyright © 2017 Millsap Farms, All rights reserved 

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Winter CSA Shares are heading out

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

We had lots of help on this beautiful CSA day! Thanks Sasha and everyone else who helped today!

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E
This is the 6th winter CSA!  Welcome back everyone!

Farm News: Getting off to a great start

February 7, 2017

Welcome back!  We’re excited for another year of vegetable growing, and have had a busy January preparing for the new season.  We’ve been cleaning up around the barn and greenhouse, getting rid of extra stuff we don’t need, moving old brush piles to make space for making more compost, pruning berries, and a myriad of other things that fall into the important, but seldom urgent category on the farm.

Of course, we’ve also been finalizing our seeding and planting plan (with a few new varieties, and mostly our tried and true standards),  and starting thousands of seedlings.  This year we’re going to try to graft most of our tomato plants, which involves growing a rootstock variety which is disease and pest resistant, then cutting off its top and replacing it with a top from a variety which has desirable fruit characteristics (like Big Beef or Cherokee Purple, both big, tasty tomatoes, which have had disease problems for us in the past).  To be sure that we have all the tomato plants we’ll need, we grow a surplus of plants, so look for the opportunity to purchase a few of these naturally grown seedlings for your own garden later in the year.

Kimby has been sorting through sales and distribution records, which is an important part of our planning process, helping us determine if we met our production goals, and if we had enough of your favorites, like tomatoes, cucumbers, head lettuce, and green beans (there were not enough green beans last year), and not too many of those items which don’t make the favorites list as often, like eggplant, okra, and kohlrabi.  Additionally, everyone living on farm has taken a vacation of one sort or another.  Sarah, Curtis, Emma and Leticia took the longest trip, travelling to Cuba for some tropical adventures, riding horses, snorkeling, hiking, and exploring Old Havana.  We had a grand adventure; this was the girls first trip overseas, and Sarah and I thoroughly enjoyed sharing our love of travel and other cultures with them.  Others took trips to Kentucky, Seattle, and Florida.  All in all, it has been a great winter, and we are off to a great start for the season, and we’re looking forward to seeing you this afternoon.

Thanks for supporting your farmers,
Curtis, Sarah, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm.

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Turmeric
Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO)
Fireburst Potatoes (organic by Alex Wood Higginsville, MO)
Kale
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthews Family Farm in AR)
Salad Mix (Tokyo bekana, arugula, lettuce)
Red Cabbage
Onions – yellow candy

Bread Share:
Oatmeal Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Turmeric
Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO)
Fireburst Potatoes (organic by Alex Wood Higginsville, MO)
Kale
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthews Family Farm in AR)
Salad Mix (Tokyo bekana, arugula, lettuce)

Sampler Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Turmeric
Butternut Squash (conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO)
Fireburst Potatoes (organic by Alex Wood Higginsville, MO)
Kale

Notes:

Turmeric, Sweet Potatoes and Fireburst Potatoes should be taken out of the plastic bag (if they are in one).  These all need to breathe and don’t like being stored in plastic.

Turmeric – make tea or curry! You can also freeze this to keep it longer. Store in your fridge or on the kitchen counter.

Fireburst Potatoes – we are excited to bring you local organic potatoes! These are a little dehydrated (wrinkles) but they are very edible! These are red/pink on the inside and out.

Squash, Red Lentil & Coconut Curry

  • 2 medium organic butternut squash
  • 7 cloves organic garlic, chopped
  • 6 inches fresh ginger, grated or finely chopped
  • 6 medium organic onions
  • 2 quarts homemade chicken bone broth*
  • 1 lb organic red split lentils
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 can organic creamed coconut
  • 2 tsp or more grated turmeric
  • Organic baby spinach (you can also use cabbage/seasonal greens) sliced
  • 2 tsp sea salt
  • 2 small limes or 1½ large lemons, juiced
  • 4 large handfuls fresh coriander, washed well

Optional

  •  ½ tsp cayenne or chilli flakes

1. Peel the squash and dice into 1 inch chunks

2. Place the garlic, onion, ginger and squash into the pan with the creamed coconut and cover with just over 8 cups of water or homemade bone broth.

3. Put the lid on and bring to a medium simmer.

4. 10 minutes later, add the red lentils, black pepper, turmeric and chilli if using, stir and let simmer on medium for a further 15-20 minutes until the lentils are soft and the squash is tender. You might wish to add the extra 1 cup of water during cooking – it depends if you like your stew thicker or thinner.

5. In the last few minutes, add the sliced cabbage/greens and stir through. If using spinach, just add when you turn off the heat so it wilts

6. Turn off the heat, add the sea salt and pepper, the juice of the lime or lemon and check for seasoning and consistency – it should be like a thick stew – add more water if needs be.

7. Stir through the roughly chopped coriander and ladle into shallow bowls to serve.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew
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5th Winter CSA delivery + Citrus

Happily cleaning turnips!
Because of the cold, much of the produce you receive today will not be washed.  We have wiped off wear appropriate (as pictured here) or just not washed at all as in the case of the lettuce, spinach and tatsoi.  We apologize for the extra dirt, but hope you enjoy the longer shelf life produce has that has not been handled excessively!

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E
This is the fifth Winter CSA!  This is the last CSA of the year – we will see you all again on February 7, 2017.  (NO CSA PICKUPS IN JANUARY!)
Notes:
1) Plastic egg carton CAN be reused by Troup, so if you want to get the egg cartons to us, we will return them so they can be sterilized and reused.  Thanks!
2) The oranges are a GIFT from us to you! Enjoy these sweet TX citrus – minimally sprayed, grown by NorAnna Farm in Mission, TX (there will be additional oranges and grapefruit for sale at the farm and at 
roundtree)

Farm News: A beautiful Fall comes to an end…

Dec 20, 2016

Tomorrow is the winter Solstice, which is the shortest day of the year, longest night, and really represents the end of the farming year more than any other calendar date.  We have been spending time the past few weeks cleaning up the fields,  organizing, repairing, recording and accounting, and generally putting things to bed for the cold weather.  Of course, on the other hand, because we are a four season farm, we have also been planting (Dill, Lettuce, radishes, and other things to be harvested after the January break).   We have continued to harvest for the CSA, Farmers Market, Harvest Restaurant, and The Order (the restaurant in Hotel V), and out two Restaurant CSA members; University Plaza and Hilton Garden Inn.  We’ve begun the planning process for next season, including what to grow, how much, and when to plant for the earliest, continuous, and latest harvests.  We’ve begun the process of budgeting for the year, figuring out ways to increase value for our community and farm, while reducing our dependence on costly (economically and environmentally) inputs from off farm.  We’ve laid plans to attend conferences in January and February, part of our endless efforts to improve our farming, for the sake of our community, ourselves, and our planet.   We’ve begun the winter-long process of machinery maintenance, fabrication, and repair, and built and filled a new woodshed.  In summary, it’s a busy time of year, but also a time for reflection, education, and preparation.   As part of that reflection, we want offer up our sincere thanks for you, our Community Supported Agriculture members, for your economic, emotional, and social commitment to the long-term success of this farm.  Because of your support, we are able to practice agriculture in a manner which improves our land, our community, and our lives, while providing an income for several families of farmers.  As part of our CSA, you have joined our community, and have voted with your pocketbook for a better tasting, healthier, and more sustainable food supply.  You’ll find a gift of South Texas Oranges in your share this week, to signify our appreciation of your membership.
Thank you for the privilege of being your farmers, and we wish you a very merry Christmas and a happy New Year.  We’ll see you again in 2017.

Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, David, Kira, Brett, and the many other hands who tend the earth at Millsap Farms

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Bell Peppers
Carrots
Ginger
Spinach
Turnips (topped Salad turnips)
Tatsoi
Head Lettuce
Onions
Sweet Potato (conventionally grown, Matthews Family Farm, AR)
Acorn Squash or Kabocha (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)
Celeriac
Beets

Bread share:
Traditional Swedish Cardamon Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

A gift:
Tree ripened Citrus from TX!

Half Share:
Bell Peppers
Carrots
GInger
Spinach
Turnips (topped Salad turnips)
Onions
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown, Matthews Family Farm, AR)
Acorn or Kabocha Squash (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Sampler Share:
Carrots
Spinach
Turnips (topped Salad turnips)
Onions
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown, Matthews Family Farm, AR)
Acorn or Kabocha Squash (Amish grown, Rich Hill, MO)

What do I do with….

Turnips:

  • Scalloped! thinly slice and bake with butter, cream, cheese and your favorite herbs.
  • Roasted – I like to mix mine with other root vegetables – bake around 425 or so until soft.
  • Mashed – just like potatoes – you can even mix with potatoes to make the turnipy taste a little milder.

Celeriac:

  • Despite their strange appearance – celeriac are lovely vegetables.  They give a flavor like celery without all the strings attached.  The tops are mostly pretty – but you can use them in stocks like celery.
  • The bulb or root part is what you want to use – peel the outer layer off and then you can eat it raw or cook it.
  • slice thinly and toss in a salad
  • add to the roasted root vegetables
  • chop and add to soup

Tatsoi: 

  • This vegetable is very similar to bok choi – you can prepare it much the same way.  The whole plant is edible.
  • Stir fry, use in salads, soups and more!
Storage tips:

Greens:
You can soak greens in ice water for about 20 minutes, then wrap them up in a paper towel (tightly) and place in a sealed plastic bag – push all the air out.  Greens like lettuce, tatosi, kale, and swiss chard will keep well this way.  I don’t recommend this for spinach or arugula – as this treatment can damage the leaves and cause them to get slimily faster.  Baby greens should be stored as you received them and washed right before you use them.

Squash, onions, and potatoes:
Winter squash, onions, garlic and potatoes can be stored at room temperature or in a cool, but not cold place.  Dark is nice, but not necessary.  Your refrigerator is too cold for the squash and potatoes (onions and garlic are ok in the fridge – this will slow down their tendency to start growing – at which point they are still edible, just not as crunchy).

Celeriac, beets, carrots and turnips:
Remove the greens, store greens in a separate bag if you want to keep and use them.  Roots can be stored in your refrigerator – they should last for a very long time (if you don’t eat them first!)

Ginger (and Turmeric):
You can leave these on your counter for a week or so – after that I would freeze it in a plastic bag or glass container.  You can then grate the ginger frozen. If you leave them on your counter for too long they will get a little dehydrated.

Kabocha Pilaf with Coconut
-bon appétit

Kabocha is the dark green winter squash thing in your share this week!

Combine 2 Tbsp dried currants with 1 Tbsp apple cider vinegar in a small bowl; set aside.
Heat 2 Tbsp coconut oil in a large skillet over medium; cook 1 chopped small onion and 4 thin slices peeled ginger, stirring occasionally, until softened, 8-10 minutes.  Stir in 1 cup shredded peeled kacocha squash, 1 cup rinsed basmati rice, and 1 1/4 cups water; season with salt and pepper.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until rice is tender, 15-18 minutes.  Remove from heat, fluff rice with a fork, and let set covered 10 minutes.  Serve topped with drained currants and toasted unsweetened coconut flakes.
4 servings

How to get that winter squash ready to use:

For stability, cut off the stem end and the base end.  Set the squash on one of these cut ends and slice it in half.  (sometimes easier said then done!).  Once in half, remove the seeds with a spoon (you can clean and toast these for a yummy snack or extra crunch on your salads).  If roasting, put halves in the oven and roast.  If you want to grate or chop or steam or stir fry squash, peel it.  It’s best to use a peeler.  Once squash is peeled it is ready for you to use in your recipes!

Kabocha and Pork Stir-Fry
– bon appétit

Steam 2 cups 1″ pieces peeled kabocha squash in a steamer basket until tender, 6-8 minutes.  Let cool slightly.  Heat 1 Tbsp vegetable oil in a large skillet and cook squash, turning occasionally until browned about 5 minutes.  Transfer to a plate.  Heat 1 Tbsp vegetable oil in skillet and cook 8 oz pork sausage, casing removed, breaking into large pieces and stirring occasionally, until browned and cooked through, about 5 minutes.  Add 2 chopped scallions, 2 chopped garlic cloves, 1 sliced serrano chile, and 2 tsp grated peeled ginger and cook, stirring often just until softened, about 2 minutes.  Add squash, 2 tbsp fresh lime juice, 2 tsp fish sauce and 1 tsp sugar, toss to combine.  Serve topped with crushed salted roasted peanuts and chopped cilantro.
4 servings.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

orangesgrapefruit

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4th Winter CSA delivery 

Millsap Farms Newsletter   Dec 6, 2016

Farm News: A season ago, Emma, 12 years old, and Anna 11 years old, took over our CSA bread shares. They have baked with me and under me but this was no small undertaking. I helped them figure out a few recipes that would work and then they took off.  

I have watched as they have learned to manage their small baking business. They now make nearly 20 loaves a week. They plan their purchasing; they’ve created a spreadsheet to keep track of these. They record their hours, and keep track of the ingredients and cost per loaf of bread.  

It became clear after finishing the summer CSA that they were going to need a separate banking account. When we went to open a baking account for their business they were disappointed that they were not old enough to own a checking account and that they must allow me to sign their checks. These two girls understand the fruits of their own labor, this is one of the reasons I love homeschooling them. They are learning practical lessons that will be applied without a doubt throughout their adulthood.

This week they have prepared Pumpkin Squash Bread. In order to do this they cooked and processed a dozen pumpkins and put them in the freezer in measured amounts for future bread. Then last night before they went to bed they thawed it out so it would be ready to go the morning. About 9:30 this morning after other school lessons finished they got busy preparing the space to make their dough, and mixed the bread. Over the next few hours they kneaded, proofed, shaped and baked their 20 loaves of bread. The work was not quite done as they always diligently clean up after themselves. Then they sat down at the computer and fill in their spreadsheet.  

Our girls are afforded this opportunity because of you. When you agree to to get a loaf of bread from them every week during the winter CSA you are supporting their entrepreneurial spirits and getting homemade bread that of course is made without preservatives. Thank you for being a part of our community!
– Sarah Millsap  

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Carrots

Turnips

Turmeric

Bok Choi

Spaghetti Squash (Amish Grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Sweet Potatoes (Matthews Family Farm, AR)

Daikon Radish

Green or Red Cabbage

Garlic

Kohlrabi

Bell Peppers

Spinach

Arugula

Kale

Cauliflower (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield)

Bread Share:

Pumpkin Yeast Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Half Share:

Carrots

Turmeric

Spaghetti Squash (Amish Grown, Richhill, MO)

Daikon Radish

Garlic

Bell Peppers

Spinach

Arugula

Cauliflower (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield)

Sampler Share:

Carrots

Spaghetti Squash (Amish Grown, Rich Hill, MO)

Bell Peppers

Spinach

Cauliflower (Fassnight Creek Farm, Springfield)

What do I do with…

Turmeric 

grate it to use fresh in cures and stir fries

slice it thin and make a hot tea with sliced ginger

juice it

freeze it and then grate frozen as you need it
Daikon Radish:

slice and add to a salad for a spicy crunch

pickle it

put it in a soup

stir fry

Homemade Food Coloring: Cabbage Blue Food Dye

 

Ingredients

Makes about 1 cup

½ small head of red cabbage, coarsely chopped

½ cup sugar

½ teaspoon baking soda

Preparation

Bring cabbage and 3 cups water to a simmer in a medium saucepan over medium-low heat and cook until cabbage is soft and liquid is reduced by about a third, 20–25 minutes.
Remove cabbage with a spider or slotted spoon; discard. Add sugar to cabbage liquid and simmer, swirling pan occasionally, until liquid is a very deep purple and has reduced to about 1 cup, 10–15 minutes. Let dye cool, then stir in baking soda. Mix into frosting or royal icing to make desired color.
(Recipe by Julia Everist)
Visit Bonappetit.com/dyes for red and yellow recipes.

 

Turmeric Tea Golden Milk (Wellness Mama)
Serves 4
Ingredients

2 cups of milk of choice (almond, pecan, coconut and dairy all work in this recipe)

1 teaspoon grated Turmeric 

½ teaspoon Cinnamon

1 teaspoon raw honey or maple syrup or to taste (optional)

Pinch of black pepper (increases absorption)

Tiny piece of fresh, peeled ginger root or ¼ tsp ginger powder

Pinch of cayenne pepper (optional)
Instructions

First, blend all ingredients in a high speed blender until smooth.

Then, Pour into a small sauce pan and heat for 3-5 minutes over medium heat until hot but not boiling.

Drink immediately

 

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