4th Winter CSA went home tonight

MILLSAP FARMS CSA
Harvesting Carrots with CSA volunteers and a Chinese student group this past Saturday.
MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHEREThis is the 4th pickup for Winter CSA.  Just as a heads up – Christmas CSA is Dec 19…FMO pickups will be Thursday, Dec 21 at the Christmas market.
Farm News: A Time to Plan
December 5, 2017
Cold weather has finally arrived, and it looks like it’s here to stay for a while.   For the farm crew, after harvest today, that means a few changes to our days:   First, we’ll start spending a bit of our time each week splitting, hauling, stacking, and feeding firewood to our greenhouse furnace and the other woodburning stoves on the farm.  We use a lot of wood on the farm, heating the shop, the main house, and the greenhouse, so we are always on the lookout for firewood.  Keep us in mind if you’ve got some wood you want to get rid of.  (By the way, we are also still accepting leaves and yardwaste, we have a great compost pile going with all the leaves you all have brought us).  Secondly, this is the time of year when we take some time off.  That means that over the next month, I’ll be gone for a week, then Cammie, and then Kimby.  One of the great things about working with such excellent co-workers is that we have the flexibility to take time off to visit family, go to the beach, or get out into the woods, knowing that things will be taken care of back on the farm while we’re gone.  Finally, this is also the time of year when we start planning in earnest for next season.  That means reviewing plans versus reality from this year (ie. how many tomatoes did we anticipate harvesting, versus how many did we actually send out the door?). We use this information to shape the plan for the coming season, tuning our plans to create better shares for our members, reduce pests, increase harvests, and improve the overall farm.  It also means soil testing, fertility planning, seed inventory, seed ordering, purchasing supplies, and generally preparing for the 2018 growing season, almost all of which happens inside, which is nice, since the highs for the next week or so will rarely break out of the 40’s.  It’s good to have a variety of things to do, and one of our favorite things about the farm is that our  work is so seasonally diverse.   We’ll see you this afternoon, and then once more, on the 19th, before the January break. 
Thanks for the privilege of being your farmers. 
Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm. 
What's in your share?
Full Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthew's Family Farm)
Winter Squash choice (conventionally grown by the Amish of Rich Hill, MO)
Bok Choi
Cilantro or dill
Elephant Garlic
Turmeric
Chestnuts  (from Charlotte Stratford, MO)
Arugula
Kale or Swisschard
Napa Cabbage or Kohlrabi
Red Beets

Bread Share:
Oatmeal Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap
Half Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthew's Family Farm)
Winter Squash choice (conventionally grown by the Amish of Rich Hill, MO)
Bok Choi
Cilantro or dill
Elephant Garlic
Turmeric
Chestnuts  (from Charlotte Stratford, MO)
Kale or Swiss chard

Sampler Share:
Spinach
Carrots
Sweet Potatoes (conventionally grown by Matthew's Family Farm) or Winter Squash choice (conventionally grown by the Amish of Rich Hill, MO)
Bok Choi
Cilantro or dill
Elephant Garlic
Chestnuts  (from Charlotte Stratford, MO)
Kale or Swisschard

Notes about:

Chestnuts:
• Sort through your bag of chestnuts and throw out any that have small holes (a beetle larva exit hole).
• Then you can freeze the chestnuts as they are to take out a roast later, or
• Roast or boil and enjoy!

Turmeric:
• turmeric will hold in your fridge for a week or so
• If you aren't going to use it all – freeze it! grate it frozen when you need it
• You can use turmeric as a seasoning in curries and stir fries
• You can use turmeric with black pepper corns, ginger and cinnamon to make a lovely spicy hot drink
• Golden milk uses turmeric
• throw a little in your smoothie
Bok Choi Salad with Sesame Dressing
Ingredients
FOR THE SESAME DRESSING:
• ¼ cup light brown sugar
• ¼ cup olive oil
• 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
• 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds (see notes)
• 1 tablespoon soy sauce
FOR THE BOK CHOY SALAD:
• 2 tablespoons olive oil
• 1 package ramen noodles crumbled, seasoning packet discarded
• ¼ cup sliced almonds
• 1 large bok choy chopped
• 5 scallions chopped
Instructions
1 To make the dressing, in a small bowl or in a jar with a tight-fitting lid, combine brown sugar, olive oil, vinegar, sesame seeds, and soy sauce. Allow flavors to blend at room temperature while preparing the rest of the salad.
2 Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large sauce pan over medium heat until shimmering. Reduce heat to low. Add ramen noodles and almonds; sauté until toasted, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently to avoid scorching.
3 In a large bowl, combine bok choy, scallions, and crunchy mix. Drizzle salad dressing over the top and toss until uniformly combined. Serve at room temperature.
Recipe Notes
You may purchase toasted sesame seeds or toast regular sesame seeds yourself. To toast sesame seeds, place in a dry skillet over the lowest possible heat and shake frequently until lightly golden brown, 10 to 15 minutes.
Portuguese Chourico and Kale Soup

Ingredients
• 2 tablespoons (2 turns around the pan) extra-virgin olive oil
• 3 medium white waxy potatoes, like yukon golds, peeled and diced
• 2 medium onions, chopped
• 4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped
• 2 bay leaves, fresh or dried
• 1 pound kale, coarsely chopped
• Coarse salt and pepper
• 1 (15-ounce) can garbanzos (chick peas), drained and rinsed
• 1 can diced tomatoes
• 1 pound diced chourico, casing removed
• 1 quart chicken broth
• Warm, crusty bread

Directions
Heat oil in a deep pot over medium high heat. Add potatoes and onions, cover and cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Add garlic, bay leaves, and kale to the pot. Cover pot and wilt greens 2 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add beans, tomatoes, chourico, and broth to the pot and bring soup to a full boil. Reduce heat back to medium and cook 5 to 10 minutes longer or until potatoes are tender.
Serve soup with hunks of crusty bread and butter.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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3rd Winter CSA in time for Thanksgiving

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Turning our compost! Thanks for all your leaves – it’s not too late to bring them out if you still need to!
MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E
Happy Thanksgiving!  This is the 3rd Winter CSA!  (Farmers Market Pick up this Wednesday from 4 to 8pm)
Farm News: Thanksgiving on the Farm
November 21, 2017
Since I’ve started farming over a decade ago, I’ve learned a lot about gratitude.

Perhaps it’s partly because of our constant exposure to the outdoors, where we realize just how vulnerable we are to the weather, which is completely out of our control.  Having seen 80 mile per hour winds, hail the size of baseballs, and unprecedented rainstorms, I’m grateful for each day that brings sunshine or rain, heat or snow.   Every morning is a cause for celebration, as a new day brings endless variety in the weather.

Perhaps it’s realizing how amazingly we are knit together, from the way our bodies continue to bend and lift to weed and harvest, or the satisfaction of learning a new skill, repeating it until it is etched in muscle memory, reducing waste motion until our bodies perform a dance with the task at hand.

Perhaps it’s appreciating that we live in a world of grace, with many opportunities for second, third, and beyond chances.  Every time we come to the end of a season I’m struck by what a blessing it is that we’ll get to try it again next season, tweaking our plan and execution just a bit. For each day that doesn’t go the way we wish it had, there is another to follow, with an opportunity to redeem what is lost.

Perhaps it’s the joy of working with my family, and close friends, helping each other accomplish the work set before us, sharing meals, playing together, meeting new friends together.

Perhaps it’s the comfort of seeing CSA members who embody what it means to be Community Supported Agriculture, as we see them weekly and talk to them about their lives and how much they value what we do here.  Our work is made so much more valuable by the appreciation of our members.

Altogether, I would say that it seems like I am right where I belong, and I’m truly grateful for that.  Thank you for your role in that, and I pray that your Thanksgiving is truly blessed.

Farmer Curtis

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Celery
Arugula
Napa Cabbage
Sweet Potatoes – conventionally grown by Matthew’s Family Farm, AR
Pie Pumpkins or Butternut Squash – conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO
Carrots
Head Lettuce
Leaf Lettuce Mix
Garlic
Spinach
Herb choice (dill, cilantro, rosemary, sage)
Chestnuts from Charlotte the Chestnut Lady – unsprayed

Bread Share:
Cracked Wheat by Emma and Anna Millsap
Half Share:
Celery
Arugula
Sweet Potatoes – conventionally grown by Matthew’s Family Farm, AR
Pie Pumpkins or Butternut Squash – conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO
Carrots
Head Lettuce
Leaf Lettuce Mix
Garlic
Spinach
Herb choice (dill, cilantro, rosemary, sage)

Sampler Share:
Celery
Sweet Potatoes – conventionally grown by Matthew’s Family Farm, AR
Pie Pumpkins or Butternut Squash – conventionally grown by the Amish in Rich Hill, MO
Carrots
Leaf Lettuce Mix
Garlic
Spinach


Chestnut Stuffing recipe
Makes 10 cups
INGREDIENTS
• 6 cups torn bite-size pieces of day-old homemade-style white bread
• 2 onions, chopped
• 4 ribs of celery, chopped
• 3 tablespoons minced fresh sage leaves or 1 tablespoon dried, crumbled
• 2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme leaves or 2 teaspoons dried, crumbled
• 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary leaves or 1 1/2 teaspoons dried, crumbled
• 1 tablespoon minced fresh savory leaves or 1 teaspoon dried, crumbled
• 1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter
• 1 pound fresh chestnuts, shelled and peeled, chopped coarse, or 3/4 pound vaccuum-packed whole chestnuts, chopped coarse (about 2 cups)
• 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh parsley leaves

PREPARATION
1 With a sharp knife cut an X on the round side of each chestnut. Spread the chestnuts in one layer in a jelly-roll pan, add 1/4 cup water, and bake the chestnuts in a preheated 450°F. oven for 10 minutes, or until the shells open. Remove the chestnuts, a handful at a time, and shell and peel them while they are still hot.
2 Reheat the oven to 325°F. In a shallow baking pan arrange the bread pieces in one layer, bake them in the oven, stirring occasionally, for 10 to 15 minutes, or until they are golden, and transfer them to a large bowl. In a large skillet cook the onions, the celery, the sage, the thyme, the rosemary, and the savory in the butter over moderately low heat, stirring, until the vegetables are softened, add the chestnuts, and cook the mixture, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the vegetable mixture to the bread pieces, tossing the mixture well, stir in the parsley and salt and pepper to taste, and let the stuffing cool completely. The stuffing may be made 1 day in advance and kept covered and chilled. (To prevent bacterial growth do not stuff turkey cavities in advance.) Makes enough to stuff a 12- to 14-pound turkey with extra to bake on the side.
Pumpkin Pie from Scratch
Makes 1 pie plus 1 quart of pumpkin custard

INGREDIENTS
• 1 small fresh pumpkin, smaller is better, about 8-12 inches tall. 2 cups finished pumpkin per pie
• 1 (12 ounce) cans evaporated milk
• 3 eggs
• 3/4 cup sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
• 1 teaspoon ground ginger
• 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, if desired
• 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves, if desired
• 1 (9 inch) deep dish pie shells
DIRECTIONS
1 Wash pumpkin, remove seeds,place in bowl and set aside,(more on seeds later).
2 cut pumpkin into pieces small enough to fit into metal colander, or veggie steamer, place into large enough pot so colander fits into it, fill bottom with water (to your second knuckle) put tight lid on pot and bring to boil. When water is boiling reduce to a hard simmer. Fork test for doneness after 1/2 hour, check water level. Repeat every 15-20 minute until done-like your boiled potatoes.
3 Drain water carefully, with clamped on lid and potholders.
4 Set aside to cool. When cool, place skin side in palm of hand and remove pulp with spoon, spoon into bowl.
5 If you want puree type pumpkin, put through sieve, food mill, blender, or food processor. I like mine using the hand potato masher, mashed well.
6 Measure out 2 cups pumpkin for pie, put into bowl. Place the rest into freezer containers for later (2 cups for pies) pies and bread or cookies, or as a side veggie.
7 Add in bowl sugar, salt, spices, eggs. Mix then carefully add milk and stir.
8 Pour into pie shell, foil edges, and place on foiled, cookie sheet and bake 350°F for 50-60 minutes. Give knife clean test. If not clean, bake longer.
9 Left over pumpkin pie mix I place into a greased 1 qt.oven proof dish and bake in a water bath like, custard.
10 Pumpkin seeds keep the kids busy, let them clean them, do not worry about the strings this is there project. Soak over night in salt water. Heat oven to 300°F; melt some butter (2-3 tsp) on cookie sheet in oven. Place drained seeds on sheet and add pumpkin pie spices and sugar or cinnamon and sugar to taste. Stir every so often- 15-20 minutes, they will stick together, just mash out with your pancake flipper. After about 30-45 minutes they should be done. Give them the “crispy” test. Careful–the hot sugar will burn your fingers.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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Winter CSA Memberships Available Starting Today!

We are offering a limited number of winter CSA shares again this fall, for sale starting today. Fall and winter crops are looking good this year, with carrots, beets, spinach, chard, kale, lettuce, salad mix, turnips, etc. off to a good start. We focus primarily on greens production in the winter, using row cover, high tunnels, and greenhouses to produce tons of spinach, pac choi, lettuce, and other greens right through the winter. In addition to the greens, the “Roots, Squash and Greens Share” includes storage crops like Sweet Potatoes, Onions, Irish Potatoes, and acorn, butternut, and spaghetti squash, and fresh root crops like turnips, carrots, beets, radishes, etc.  The greens, onions, garlic, and fresh roots are almost entirely grown on our farm, using organic practices. Most of the squash, potatoes, and sweet potatoes are purchased from other farms in Missouri and Arkansas, many of which use conventional practices.  As always, we make every effort to make sure you are informed about where all your food comes from, and how it is raised.

Once again this winter we will be distributing shares every other week, rather than weekly, with a break during January. The first distribution day will be Tuesday October 24, with distributions on November 7&21, December 5&19, February 6&20, March 6&20, April 3&17, and May 1. By reducing the number of distributions, we save you all some driving, reduce the cost of delivery, have more time for on-farm projects, and still provide you with an excellent supply of fresh greens and other veggies. There is a break around the holidays, so we can have a little time off, and because that is part of the time when the harvests tend to get pretty slim.  For the first time this year, we are also offering a first half of the season only option; if you would like to have veggies until the end of the year, but aren’t sure about next February, March, or April, then this might be a good option for you.

That makes for 12 boxes of veggies for the full season, each intended to last you approximately 2 weeks, for a total of 24 weeks of veggies. Cost for the Winter Squash, Roots and Greens Share will be $28/ week, for a total of $665, with half shares costing $16/week ($385) and a 1/4 share, for those who are just wanting to get their feet wet in CSA (sort of a sampler size), for just $10.40/week($250).  As in past seasons, you can pay this up front for a discount, or make two payments, with 50% due on sign up, and 50% due by the end of January.

The bread share will be one loaf per distribution, so 12 loaves @$5 apiece for the season. The Millsap Girls are our bakers again this winter, and if you tried the bread this summer, you know you don’t want to miss out on the bread share. If you need a loaf per week, then feel free to order two shares, and then stick one in the freezer until you’re ready for it.

As always, we require a 12 hour per season workshare commitment from members, meaning that you come to the farm to help us harvest or weed for 12 hours. We do offer a chance to opt out of the workshare by paying a fee of $100 to offset the loss of labor on the farm. We realize that some people are just too busy, or have other reasons for not committing to a workshare, and we don’t want this to keep anyone from joining the CSA.

You have 4 options for pickup:

Tuesdays;

  • Pick up at Millsap Farms, Tuesdays 4 – 5 pm
    • 6593 N Emu Lane, Springfield, MO 65803
    • Click Here For Map
  • Delivery to Your Door, Tuesdays 4 -7 pm
    • Springfield/Nixa City Limits Only
      • $6 – $7/Week Charge
      • One-time $14 Container Fee
  • Rountree Neighborhood Pick Up Tuesday 4-6
    • 1019 S Kentwood Rountree neighborhood
      • $3/week Charge
      • One-time $14 Container Fee
  • Farmers Market of the Ozarks Saturday 8 -1
    • 2144 E Republic Rd at our farmers market booth
      • $2 fee

Sign Up: If you’re ready to sign up, then click on this link:http://millsapfarm.csasignup.com/members and get started.

If you have more questions, please call or e-mail, millsapfarm@gmail.com, or 417-839-0847  to talk with Curtis Millsap, co-owner of Millsap Farm.

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Summer CSA Week 16

!
Farm News: A Change of Atmosphere
August 22, 2017
A change of atmosphere. 
It’s amazing how shortsighted we can be.  Last week, as the temperatures repeatedly soared above 90, and never dropped below 70, it seemed like it had always been hot and humid on these twenty acres, and would never change.  It seemed we were going to be miserably hot for the rest of our lives, and the weeds would overtake us, leaving a mass of ragweed and Johnson grass where we had once toiled to grow carrots and squash.  It takes a lot of imagination, and even faith, to remember that in three more months, we will have frozen ground, icy winds, and wood fires to huddle around.  As we finish our 11th summer on the farm, we still struggle to reconcile what is with what is to come.  In our more aware moments, we enjoy the tension between the past, present and future.  We relish the heat, remembering and anticipating days that are cold enough to frost our eyebrows (and kill all the weeds).  Days like today, with a sudden cool change, bring a wash of memories of beautiful carrots, turnips, pumpkins, and greens, along with a quickening of step, as we start to feel the approach of shorter days and cold nights.  Time to make hay while the sun shines, lay aside for slim days, and enjoy the delight of working outside in amazing weather.   I hope you enjoy the weather as much as we do.
Sincerely,
Farmer Curtis and The Crew
 
What's in your share?
Full Share:
Hot peppers or Elephant Garlic
Onions
Garlic
Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Carrots
Eggplant
Cherry tomatoes
Cucumbers
Cantaloupe (Amish Produce Auction)

Bread Share:
Honey Whole wheat Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
Peaches – Bader Farms
Half Share:
Hot Peppers or Elephant garlic
Onions
Garlic
Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers
Okra or Squash
Cantaloupe (Amish Produce Auction)

Sampler Share:
Hot Peppers or Elephant Garlic
Onions
Garlic
Tomatoes
Cucumber
Cantaloupe (Amish Produce Auction)
 
Summer Tomato & Cantaloupe Salad
serves 4-5

VEGGIES
• 1/2 cup (52 g) thinly sliced cucumber
• 1/2 cup (75 g) cherry tomatoes, thinly sliced
• 1/4 (20 g) red onion, thinly sliced
• 1 Tbsp (15 ml) olive or avocado oil
• 2 tsp apple cider vinegar
• Healthy pinch each sea salt + black pepper
DRESSING
• 3 Tbsp (45 ml) lime juice
• 1 Tbsp (15 ml) maple syrup
• Pinch sea salt
• 1 Tbsp (15 ml) olive or avocado oil
CANTALOUPE
• 3 heaping cups (~520 g) cantaloupe, cubed or scooped with a melon baller (~1 cantaloupe)
• 2 Tbsp (3 g) fresh mint
Instructions
1 Add cucumber, tomato, and onion to a small mixing bowl and top with olive oil, apple cider vinegar, salt, and pepper. Toss to combine. Then taste and adjust flavor as needed, adding more vinegar for acidity or salt and pepper for flavor balance. Set in the refrigerator to chill.
2 Next, prepare dressing by adding lime juice, maple syrup, and sea salt to a small mixing bowl and whisking to combine. Then slowly stream in olive oil while whisking to combine. Taste and adjust flavor as needed, adding more lime juice for brightness/acidity, maple syrup for sweetness, or salt for flavor balance. Set aside.
3 Add cantaloupe to a large serving bowl and top with dressing. Gently toss to combine. Then add the cucumber-tomato-onion salad on top, leaving any excess liquid/dressing behind.
4 Gently toss to combine and garnish with fresh mint. Serve.
5 Best when fresh, though leftovers keep in the refrigerator up to 3 days. Leave mint on the side to keep as fresh as possible.
Jalapeño Hot Sauce
"Hot Sauce from scratch. You may use other hot peppers in place of the jalapeños." – Cut the recipe in half for smaller batches.
Ingredients
• 1 teaspoon vegetable oil
• 20 fresh jalapeno peppers, sliced
• 3 cloves garlic, minced
• 1/2 cup minced onion
• 3/4 teaspoon salt
• 2 cups water
• 1 cup distilled white vinegar
Directions
1 In a medium glass or enamel lined sauce pan over high heat, combine oil, peppers, garlic, onion and salt; saute for 4 minutes. Add the water and cook for 20 minutes, stirring often. Remove from heat and allow mixture to cool to room temperature.
2 Transfer the mixture to a food processor and puree until smooth. With the processor running, slowly add the vinegar.
3 Pour into a sterilized jar with a tight lid. This sauce will keep for 6 months when stored in the refrigerator.
Grilled Eggplant Sandwiches
Makes 4 sandwiches
• Aioli:
• 1/4 cup light mayonnaise
• 1 tablespoon extravirgin olive oil
• 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
• 1 garlic clove, minced
• Sandwiches:
• 1 (1-pound) eggplant, cut crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices
• 1 tablespoon kosher salt
• 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
• 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
• 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh rosemary
• Cooking spray
• 4 (1/2-inch-thick) slices red onion
• 8 (1/2-inch-thick) slices Italian bread
• 8 (1/4-inch-thick) slices tomato
• 2 cups lightly packed arugula leaves
Step 1
To prepare aioli, combine the first 4 ingredients in a small bowl, stirring well. Cover and chill.
Step 2
To prepare sandwiches, arrange eggplant in a single layer on several layers of heavy-duty paper towels. Sprinkle both sides of eggplant with salt; cover with additional paper towels. Let stand 30 minutes, pressing down occasionally. Rinse eggplant with cold water. Drain and pat dry.
Step 3
Prepare grill.
Step 4
Combine thyme, parsley, and rosemary in a small bowl, stirring well. Lightly coat eggplant slices with cooking spray; sprinkle with herb mixture.
Step 5
Arrange eggplant and onion on grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 2 minutes on each side or until vegetables are tender and lightly browned. Remove from heat, and keep warm. Arrange bread slices in a single layer on grill rack coated with cooking spray, and grill for 1 minute on each side or until toasted.
Step 6
Spread about 2 teaspoons aioli over 1 side of 4 bread slices; divide eggplant and onion evenly among bread slices. Place 2 tomato slices on each sandwich; top each serving with 1/2 cup arugula. Spread about 2 teaspoons of remaining aioli over 1 side of remaining 4 bread slices; place on top of sandwiches.
Step 7
Wine note: With vegetables we often think white wine, but grilled eggplant's smoky flavor and pleasantly bitter skin marries well with medium-bodied, rustic reds. Try a Tuscan blend like Tenuta di Arceno PrimaVoce 2003 ($20). The wine's cherry fruit has hints of leather and earth to amplify the herbal flavors of rosemary and thyme, while its vivid acidity balances the creamy aioli. –Jeffery Lindenmuth
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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CSA Week 15

Farm News: Cooperation is Key to Great Food

August 15, 2017

We work with several other farms to provide everything we offer our members.   We have three different ways to cooperate with these farms.  The fruit share is a multiple farm share, where we purchase wholesale fruit from Browns Berries and Sasha and Jimmy Rhea (strawberries),  Peaches from Bader Farms, Blackberries and blueberries from Ozark Mountain Orchard, and apples from A&A Orchard and Gardeners Orchard .  Some of these folks are using conventional chemical approaches, others are using more sustainable practices.  Either way, we let you know how they were raised, and we seek out the very best fruit we can find.   The cheese and egg shares are single farm shares; our friends Lesley and Barry Millions at Terrell Creek in Fordland make the best goat cheese we’ve ever tasted, and the Boosey family of Blue Heron Farm take raising eggs to the level of an art , allowing their chickens to pasture freely, leading to really beautiful dark yolks. They bring these shares by and drop them off for you to enjoy.   Our meat shares are provided by independent farmers who deliver their shares directly to their members at our farm;  this includes Providence Farm, who provide a heritage poultry share (think geese, ducks, and Cornish game hens),  Bechard Farm, who provide pasture raised chicken, and  Emmanuel and Lydia Schwartz, an amish couple from El Dorado who provide pasture raised Highland beef and pork.   Additionally, there are farms who we source some produce from, like this weeks watermelons, purchased for us at the amish produce auction by Dan Bigby of Fassnight Creek Farm, who sometimes also supplies us with sweet corn,  snap peas, or other goodies.   Altogether, our farm coordinates with as many as a dozen other farms throughout the season to provide you with the best possible produce.   This means that you are not only supporting our farm when you become a member, but you are also helping other farms in the area fulfill their missions as well.  Farming is risky business, but by cooperating and receiving the support of a community of like-minded members such as yourselves, we have created a vibrant, strong network of producers.
Thank you for that.
From Curtis and Dan and Sasha and Jimmy and Crystal and John and Lesley and Barry and James and Wes and Ame and Armand and Teddy and Emmanuel and Lydia and all our families and crews.
What’s in your share? d67d85b9-45c0-4dad-86e8-d10edb8fd45a
Full Share:
Watermelon (Amish Produce Auction)
Tomatoes
Carrots
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers
Romas or Cherry Tomatoes
Okra or Carmen Peppers
Rosemary
Leaf Lettuce

Bread Share:
Cracked Wheat Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
Peaches from Bader Farms

Half Share:
Watermelon (Amish Produce Auction)
Tomatoes
Carrots
Bell Peppers
Cucumber

Sampler Share:
Watermelon (Amish Produce Auction)
Tomatoes
Carrots

Creamy Roasted Red Pepper Sauce

  • 2 cups roasted red peppers, skinned and seeded
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp dried basil
  • Freshly cracked pepper
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  1. Add the roasted red peppers to a blender along with about 2 Tbsp of the liquid or water. Purée the peppers until smooth, adding a tablespoon or two of water if needed to help it blend.
  2. Mince the garlic and add it to a skillet with the butter. Sauté the garlic in the butter over medium-low heat for 1-2 minutes, or just until the garlic has softened and becomes very fragrant (but not browned). Pour in the puréed peppers, and add the dried basil and some freshly cracked pepper. Stir to combine.
  3. Allow the sauce to come up to a simmer. Turn the heat down to low and let the sauce simmer for 10-15 minutes, stirring often, or until the mixture is thick (see photos below).
  4. Add the heavy cream to the skillet, stir until the sauce is smooth, and allow to heat through. Taste the sauce ad add salt if needed (I found the liquid from the jar added enough salt for me). Serve warm.
Spicy Sautéed Okra

  • 1 pound okra
  • 1 small onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 to 3 hot chiles
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable or grapeseed oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • Sea salt
  1. Rinse and trim the okra (cut off and discard the stem ends, particularly on any larger pods). Cut any but the very smallest of pods into bite-size pieces. Truly tiny pods can be left whole, if you like. Set the okra aside.
  2. Trim off and discard the stem and root ends of the onion. Cut in half lengthwise; remove and discard the onion peel. Mince the onion and set aside.
  3. Peel and mince the garlic cloves. Set aside.
  4. Remove and discard the stems from the chiles. Cut the chiles in half lengthwise; remove and discard the seeds. Cut the chile halves crosswise as thinly as possible. Set aside.
  5. Heat a heavy pot over high heat. Add the oil and the cumin seeds. Cook, stirring, until the cumin seeds start to turn color, and become extra fragrant about 30 seconds. Add the onion, garlic, and chile slices. Stir to combine everything. The spices and aromatics should be sizzling the entire time.
  6. Add the okra. Cook, stirring frequently, until the okra is tender to the bite and brown on the edges, 5 to 10 minutes. Adjust the heat so the okra is sizzling, but the garlic and other aromatics don’t char or burn.
  7. Transfer the okra to a serving platter.
  8. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste and spritz with lemon juice, if you like. Serve hot or warm.

While any leftovers are tasty, this isn’t a great make-ahead dish; you can, however, do all the chopping a few hours ahead and store things, covered and chilled, until you’re ready to quickly cook it closer to serving time.

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew
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Pizza 7-28-17 Pop-up Friday

Menu 7-28-17 get your reservation at http://millsapfarm.csasignup.com/store/pizza-night-tickets

Due to the rain on Thursday we postponed our Pizza Club. Good news because now you can come!!

Date Lady Pulled Pork
Homemade Date Lady pizza sauce, Pulled pork, peaches, red onion, mozzarella, thyme
Margherita
Homemade red sauce, basil, tomatoes, fresh mozzarella      
Creamy Corn and Roasted Pepper
Homemade white sauce, roasted peppers, oregano, mozzarella, Terrell Creek Feta/Chevre       
Farmhouse Cheese
Homemade red sauce all covered up with cheese  
 
 

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This is CSA week 12

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

The crew this morning picking green beans!
MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E
This is CSA week 12!  

Reminder: If you are not able to pick up your share on Tuesday/Saturday, and would like us to hold it in the farm cooler, please let us know and we will gladly do that for you to pick up later.  If you do not let us know, we will not pack up a share for you.  Thanks!
Farm News: Planting for the future, Harvesting for the Present 
July 25, 2017
CSA and market farming is all about looking ahead while also paying enough attention to the present to do it justice.  This week we are balancing our time between harvesting hundreds of pounds of summer favorites, like bell peppers, green beans, sweet corn, tomatoes, eggplant and basil, and preparing beds for fall, including planting kohlrabi, broccoli, kale, lettuce, carrots, beets, and cauliflower.   This means that our attention has to be somewhat divided; being sure that our current crops are being watered, harvested, and generally cared for, while at the same time putting a lot of effort into tilling, laying biodegradeable mulch, transplanting, etc.  After ten years of farming, it’s easier than it used to be to maintain this tension between working in the present and preparing for the future, but it’s still a challenge.  In fact, it’s one of the things that keeps our vocation interesting; the constant challenge of timing, prioritizing, creating and executing the plan.   So while we are swimming in tomatoes, and hot peppers are just beginning to be harvested, and we love all the fresh salsa and pizza sauce that those bring with them, we are also working hard to be sure that come September and October and November, we’ll all be enjoying an abundance of fresh carrots, broccoli, lettuce, and cabbage, the fruit of planning and execution from months before.  

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers.
Curtis, Sarah, and the Crew at Millsap Farm
 
What's in your share?
Full Share:
Tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce
Sweet Corn (caterpillars included)
Summer Squash
Cucumbers
Choice of eggplant, okra or oyster mushrooms*

Bread Share:
Marketplace Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
White peaches and Yellow peaches – Bader Farm
Half Share:
Tomatoes
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce

Sampler Share:
Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
Green Beans
Mini Head Lettuce

*Oyster mushrooms eaten raw can cause some people to vomit. Oyster mushrooms store best in a paper bag in your fridge. Plastic makes them slimy.

Grilled Okra
(Serves 6)
• 1 pound okra, washed
• 2 teaspoons olive oil
• salt, to taste
• ground black pepper, to taste
• pinch of cayenne pepper, optional
1 Skewer okra or place in a grill basket to prevent it from going through the grill grates while cooking. Drizzle with olive oil and place onto grill that has been preheated to around 450º F.
2 Cook until the skin of the okra begins to caramelize and then flip to cook the other side.
3 Remove from the grill and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste. Add cayenne pepper, if desired.
4 Serve warm.
One Pot Stuffed Pepper Casserole
(Serves 6)
• 1 tablespoon olive oil
• 1 pound ground beef*
• 1 onion, diced
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• 1 green bell pepper, diced
• 1 red bell pepper, diced
• 2 (14.5-ounce) cans diced tomatoes
• 1 (4-ounce) can diced green chiles
• 1 cup rice
• 1 cup beef broth*
• 1 teaspoon chili powder
• 1/2 teaspoon cumin
• Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves
• 1 cup shredded Wisconsin cheddar cheese
• 1/2 cup shredded Wisconsin Monterey Jack cheese
1 Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add ground beef, onion and garlic. Cook until beef has browned, about 3-5 minutes, making sure to crumble the beef as it cooks; drain excess fat.
2 Stir in bell peppers until tender, about 3-4 minutes
3 Stir in tomatoes, green chiles, rice, beef broth, chili powder and cumin; season with salt and pepper, to taste. Bring to a boil; cover, reduce heat and simmer until rice is cooked through, about 16-18 minutes. Stir in cilantro.
4 Remove from heat and top with cheeses. Cover until cheese has melted, about 2 minutes.
5 Serve immediately.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew

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Tomatoes Tomatoes Tomatoes!  It’s CSA Week 11

MILLSAP FARMS CSA NEWSLETTER

Over 700 pounds of tomatoes this week – start thinking’ about all those yummy tomato recipes!!

MILLSAP FARM ELSEWHERE

W E B S I T E

Farm News: Heat on the Farm

July 18, 2017

This time of year we get asked a lot about how heat effects the farm, so I thought I’d share some insights about high temperature vegetable growing.   Like many aspects of our farm, we look at this through three lenses; people, profits, and planet.   For the people on the farm, the heat means challenging work conditions;  95 degrees with 70% humidity makes for miserably sweaty weather, so we rise early, starting work at 6 a.m., and get a head start on the heat.  That means that by 1p.m. we are hot, sweaty, and ready for lunch, which is the end of our official work day.  If  we have things what must get done, we will wait until after the heat passes, 6 or 7 p.m., and go back out to work, or work wet (meaning hosing off or taking a dunk every hour or so).   We call this the siesta schedule, and it helps us face the dog days of summer with energy and stamina.  It also helps that most days we take a trip to the creek to dip and cool off, and we occasionally take off a whole day to float a creek and thoroughly relax and refresh the crew.

In terms of profits, hotter days mean a change in what we can grow for sale;  the lettuces and most other salad greens are just too stressed by this heat and bolt (go to seed) before they are large enough to harvest (although we are trying some new things this summer, stay tuned), while some crops like tomatoes and bell peppers and cucumbers shrug off the heat and ramp up production.  If it gets too hot, even the tomatoes can revolt; night time temperatures consistently above 75 will cause tomatoes to drop their blossoms, which means no new fruit being set. This is the sort of problem that has a delayed cost;  4-6 weeks after an extreme hot spell we find that the tomatoes have a gap in fruit supply.  We can deal with this to some extent by sheltering tomatoes from the worst of the suns rays,  planting later successions of heat tolerant varieties (florida 91’s are one such variety), and keeping them well watered,  but ultimately we can only do so much, and high heat decreases yields, leaving fewer veggies for our members and our market stand.  Finally, from the environmental, or planet perspective, we have increased energy use when the temps are high, due to increased water usage and a heavier load on our walk-in cooler.  Our efforts to reduce water and electricity pay their biggest dividends this time of year, and we hope to continue to reduce our footprint this way as we refine and remodel our farm stand space, along with improving our soils, which reduces our need for watering.

All in all, heat is one of the bigger challenges or our climate; it stresses people, the budget, and our commitment to reducing our environmental impact, but over time we’ve developed systems which help us cope and even thrive.  Plus, what would summer be without a few hot days to spend in the creek eating watermelon?

Thanks for trusting us to be your farmers.
Curtis and the crew.

What’s in your share?
Full Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Eggplant
Basil or Rosemary
Cherry tomatoes
Bell Pepper
Squash, Cucumber or Okra
Onions
Jalapeños
Beets

Bread Share:
French Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap

Fruit Share:
Peaches from Bader Farm

Half Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers, Squash or Okra
Basil or Rosemary
Onions

Sampler Share:
Tomatoes
Sweet Corn*
Bell Peppers
Cucumbers, Squash or Okra

*This is our sweet corn – it DOES have some caterpillars in the ear. 

Sicilian Tomato and Onion Salad Recipe
Serves 4

  • 3 -4 large ripe tomatoes
  • 1⁄2-1 medium  sweet onion, depending on how much onion you like (Vidallia is my favorite)
  • 1⁄4cup  extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon  dried oregano
  • 1⁄4teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1⁄8teaspoon fresh cracked black pepper
  • 4 -6 leaves  fresh basil, chopped to garnish (depending on how much Basil you like)
  1. Cut tomatoes into bite size pieces.
  2. Sprinkle with garlic salt and pepper.
  3. Peel a cut onion in half vertically.
  4. Along edge of open side, “sliver” cut onion and add to tomatoes.
  5. Add the rest of ingredients and toss lightly.
  6. Marinate for at least an hour.
  7. Serve with Italian bread, provolone cheese and hard salami (or other Italian meats.).
Fresh Sweet Corn Salad with Tomatoes and Feta
Serves 6

  • 5 ears of corn, husk and silk removed
  • 1 pint sweet cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 3 green onions, sliced (1/3 cup)
  • ⅓ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • ⅓ cup crumbled feta
  • 3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 medium garlic clove, pressed
  • salt and black pepper
  1. In a large pot, bring water to a boil. Add corn and boil for 3 minutes. Remove corn to a plate and cool just enough to handle. When the corn is cool, cut the kernels off the cob, cutting close to the cob, and place them in a large bowl. You should have approximately 4 cups of corn.
  2. Add the tomatoes, green onions, cilantro, and feta to the corn.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk the olive oil, vinegar, and garlic. Pour over the salad and toss well to combine. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Cover and chill for 15-30 minutes before serving.
Okra with Tomatoes

Saute 4 smashed garlic cloves in 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat until golden. Add 4 cups okra (halved lengthwise) and 1 small onion (cut into wedges); season with salt and pepper and cook until the okra is tender and bright, 10 to 12 minutes. Add 1 pint halved cherry tomatoes; cook until just bursting, 3 minutes. Finish with a splash of cider vinegar.

Tomato and Eggplant Tian
4 servings

  • 2 to 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 small eggplant, sliced 1/4-inch thick
  • Kosher salt
  • 2 small onions, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rounds
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 small tomatoes, sliced into 1/4-inch thick rounds
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan

Position the oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a large saute pan, heat 1 tablespoon oil over medium-high heat. Add the eggplant slices, season with salt and cook until golden on both sides. Remove to a plate and repeat with the onion slices.

Rub a small baking dish with the garlic clove. Layer the eggplant, onions, and tomato slices in rows in the baking dish. Drizzle a little more olive oil on top. Cover the baking dish with aluminum foil and bake until heated through and the tomatoes are soft but still hold their shape, about 20 minutes. Remove the baking dish and set the oven to broil. Sprinkle the tomatoes with the shredded cheese and broil to melt and brown the cheese, about another 2 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve.

Recipe courtesy of Melissa d’Arabian

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!
~Millsap Farm Crew
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Farm News: The Three P’s of Sustainable Farming, Part 3- ProfitJuly 11, 2017

This week we continue with our essay about what it means for Millsap Farm to be sustainable.
 

Harlequin bugs are frustrating little bugs that LOVE our kale, cabbages, bok choi, arugula and collards. They suck the plant sap out of the leafs and leave yellow and brown damage. We are instituting a “Brassica” (plant family that Harlequin bugs like to eat) free month of July. All our kale is mowed – so no more kale until the fall planted greens are ready to harvest.

People often tour our farm to see a sustainable farm in action, either as educational groups, or as part of pizza night. When they arrive on farm, I give a brief introduction; first generation farm family, 20 acres, on farm for 10 years, 2 acres in vegetable production, selling through CSA, Farmers Market of The Ozarks, and a few restaurants, three or four full time farm workers, etc. Then I explain that we try to make all of our decisions through the lens of the three P’s; Planet, People, and Profit.  

 

Profit is the third leg of our sustainability stool, and it is every bit as important as the others. If we don’t farm in a profitable manner, we will not be in business for very long. So as we make choices about how to grow and sell produce, we look carefully at how it will impact our profitability. One example of this is the amount we do or don’t heat our greenhouse; many greenhouses use large propane forced air heaters to keep their greenhouses warm through the winter, but we have chosen to avoid the expense of fueling these heaters, because in our analysis, we are better off using less heat, and providing it with wood burning furnaces. This also means we grow things with require less heat, and that means less risk; if our greenhouse gets a little cold in January, that’s not a problem for our head lettuces, carrots, and spinach, whereas if we were growing tomatoes or other heat loving crops using higher temperatures, we would lose our entire investment if we had a freeze at the wrong time. Instead we wait until a little later in the year to grow the heat lovers, when we can rely on the sun to do 90% of our heating, and supplement with wood and propane to keep thing s going on the occasional very cold night in March and April. This way we still get to keep our members and farmers market customers happy with early produce, but don’t have a risky investment. 

 

Another example of examining our farm structure with profit in mind is the CSA model. We love that one way we are linked to our members is that we all have a financial stake in the outcome each season. Our members invest in us, considering it a good investment that will yield healthy food for their families, a cleaner environment, and a satisfying connection to the source of their food. At the same time, their investment helps our bottom line by giving us operating capital during the early part of the year, when many farms take out risky loans to pay for seeds, fuel, tools, fertilizer, labor, and all the other things it takes to grow food in the earth. Instead of costly credit, we use the money you all have entrusted to us to get our season started debt free. In a business as inherently risky as farming, it’s nice to start each year on a solid financial footing provided by our members, which is one more reason we love CSA.

 

I hope you’ve enjoyed the brief snapshot that these three P’s have given you of our decision making framework on the farm, please feel free to ask questions and communicate with us. We love to hear from our members.
Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers. 

Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, Erick, Caitlyn, Elsa, Colby, Ella, David, Emma, Leticia, Anna, Isabella, Leta, Sophia, Grace, Ruth, Reuben, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm.

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicer Tomatoes

Eggplant

Bell Pepper

Yellow Onions

Romaine Lettuce

Carrots

Kohlrabi or squash choice

Basil

Celery

Cucumber
Bread Share:

Oatmeal Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap
Fruit Share:

Peaches – Bader Farms

Half Share:

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicer TOmatoes

Eggplant

Bell Pepper

Yellow Onions

Red mini head lettuce

Kohlrabi or squash choice

Basil

Cucumber
Sampler Share:
Cherry Tomatoes

Eggplant

Yellow Onions

Carrots

Cucumber
 

Alternative ways to use your CSA veggies….
Freezing: 

Most things need to be blanched first and then frozen. Good candidates are tomatoes, Kale, Squash, Peppers (these can just be cut and frozen on a cookie sheet then put in a ziplock in the freezer), okra, basil pesto, etc.
Fermenting:

Generally – chop up your veggies, add preferred herbs, put in a mason jar or other glass jar – fill with salty water and let ferment on your counter for a couple days to a week. Then keep them in the fridge. Look up recipes to get an exact salt amount. Great things to ferment are: Cucumbers, Beets, Carrots, Onions, Peppers, Kohlrabi, Squash, Corn, Garlic, etc.
Pickling:

Add some vinegar and keep in your fridge (or can them if you like). Usually salt and or sugar and spices are involved!

Great things to Pickle: Cucumbers, Squash, Onions, Okra, Peppers etc.
 

Roasted Eggplant Dip with Greek Yogurt

3 medium eggplants (about 2 pounds) 

1 small garlic clove, minced 

Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper 

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling 

1/2 cup plain full-fat Greek yogurt 

1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (from 2 lemons)
Using tongs, cook eggplants one at a time over the flame of a gas burner (or a grill), turning as skin chars and bubbles, until completely soft, about 15 minutes. (If eggplant doesn’t soften, finish cooking on a baking sheet in a 375-degree oven.) Let stand until cool enough to handle, about 15 minutes. Peel off charred skin and discard. Coarsely chop the eggplants, and place in a colander to drain, about 1 hour. Finely chop, and transfer to a bowl. 

Using a chef’s knife, press flat side of blade back and forth across garlic and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt to make a paste. Mix into eggplant. Stir in oil. Mix in yogurt and lemon juice, and season with salt and pepper. (Dip can be refrigerated, for up to 1 day.) Drizzle with oil before serving.
 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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The Three P’s of Sustainable farming, Part 2, People MatterJuly 5, 2017

This week we return to the topic of sustainable farming, after a brief interruption last week to note the wind damage to the high tunnels. 
 

People often tour our farm to see a sustainable farm in action, either as educational groups, or as part of pizza night. When they arrive on farm, I give a brief introduction; first generation farm family, 20 acres, on farm for 10 years, 2 acres in vegetable production, selling through CSA, Farmers Market of The Ozarks, and a few restaurants, three or four full time farm workers, etc. Then I explain that we try to make all of our decisions through the lens of the three P’s; Planet, People, and Profit.  

 

People are a key part of the farm community, from family members and farmworkers to CSA members, to the wider community that attends pizza night and buys from us at the farmers market. We want to treat the people involved with our farm in an ethical and principled way, and in a way that honors their desire to be happy and have a balanced life. For example, one of the reasons we have lots of covered growing space on the farm is because it gives us a place to work in inclement weather; because we can keep busy even in poor weather, we are able to even out our workload, rather than cramming all our work into a few perfect days. Another benefit of growing under covered space is that we are able to supply good fresh food for our members year-round, which makes them happy. Our decision to grow naturally is also a choice we made largely due to people; we feel good about feeding our family and members food that doesn’t contain pesticide residue. Our open door policy is also a result of this principle; it’s increasingly difficult for folks to connect with the source of their food, and even rarer for families to participate in a hands-on way. We love having our members come work with us on the farm, and we have structured our farm in such a way that this is possible. There are many more examples of the way people are considered on our farm, from our vacation policy to our options for delivery and pickup of your shares; we try to keep this a central guiding principle as we continue to process of creating and remaking the farm.

 

Reminder; summer CSA balances are due as of this month; if you still have a balance, you’ll be receiving an e-mail with payment information on it, you are welcome to bring payment to CSA pickup, mail it, or pay online.

 

Next week, a look at a couple of ways that the third P of sustainable farming ties into the design of our farm. 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers. 
Curtis, Sarah, Kimby, Cammie, David, Erick, Elsa, Caitlyn, Ella, Colby, Emma, Leticia, Anna, Isabella, Leta, Sophia, Grace, Ruth, Reuben, and the rest of the crew at Millsap Farm.

 

 

What’s in your share?

Full Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Kale

Salad greens

Head Lettuce

Basil

Garlic
Bread Share:

Honey Whole wheat Bread by Emma and Anna Millsap


Fruit Share:

Peaches by Bader Farms

Half Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Kale

Salad Greens
Sampler Share:

Carrots

Slicer tomatoes

Cucumber

Squash

Salad Greens

 

Pesto:
4-6 cups Basil – take the large stems out

1 cup Olive oil

4 to 6 garlic cloves

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

1/4 cup nuts (pine nuts are traditional, walnuts work just fine)

salt and pepper to taste
Mix it all in a blender. Add more olive oil if your blender needs more liquid. Will keep for two weeks in your fridge. You can also freeze in an ice cube tray and keep it for a while in the freezer!

Millet Pesto Summer Salad

– from the full helping
Ingredients

1 cup millet, dry

2¼ cups low sodium vegetable broth or water

3 cups zucchini, chopped into ¾” pieces

3 cups eggplant, chopped into ¾” pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil

Sea salt and black pepper to taste

1 large beefsteak or heirloom tomato, chopped

½-2/3 cup pesto

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Lay the zucchini and eggplant pieces on one or two lined baking sheets and drizzle them with the oil, then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. Transfer them to the oven and roast for 30-35 minutes, or until tender. Stir them once, halfway through cooking.

Place the millet and broth or water in a medium sized saucepan or pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until the millet absorbs all of the liquid. Fluff the millet with a fork, re-cover, and allow it to steam for 5 minutes.

Transfer the millet to a bowl. Add the roasted vegetables, the fresh tomato, and the pesto. You can adjust the amount of pesto you use to taste, and you can also season the salad to taste with black pepper and extra salt. A little squeeze of lemon at the end is nice, too! Serve.

4-6 servings

 

Thanks for choosing us to be your farmers!

~Millsap Farm Crew

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